Anti-American Sentiment in the FFL

enjolras

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#24
It seems 2e REP hasn't evolved with the times as much as the other regiments...

In an answer to the OP, yes there's a bit of anti-anglophone (not so much American) behaviour in my regiment due to the fact that it's perceived you come from a good country and you can make a lot of money over there. The Americans here are usually guys that have stuffed up majorly in their country however they're also usually some of the best soldiers, very capable. Like all things, it depends on your unit/caporal/sergeant/your personality but you can get some flack. Nothing over the top.

Edit: realise now the OP was talking about selection. C'est pas grave...
 

Le petit caporal

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#25
How many times have the French administration (judges, police, préfecture, social workers) and the general population told me “casse-toi”, “rentre chez toi, sale Rosbeef” or “t'es pas de chez nous” (bugger off, go back home bloody Brit, you're not from here)? I have lost count
Ex-legionnaire or not, am still not considered by them. This is a typical, common attitude, among the French. An anti anglophone xénophobie and concerns not just "Yankees", but any buddy who refuses to incline to the French dillusion of being the best at everything... They've done it all, they do it best, they know it best. My hairy arse, they do !
Smug, arrogant, and chauvinistic yet,for many, unpatrioctic. Then again, when and where did someone's patriotism, get them anywhere i ask you? Remember this, wannabes: if you make it in the Legion on thing is for sure is. You will make your superiors career and receive all the thanks in a leaking basket.
Cozette

Darwinism and the natural selection... Where only the French survive.
 

kkillert0fu

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#26
Well hey guys thanks for the responses and for having this conversation. It's been very insightful and I really appreciate it. If anything it has strengthened my resolve in my plan to go should I not be accepted into the US Army. Like I said, I'm just trying to look at it from all angles.

from reading your post though and the tone it gave off (i can be wrong as its just a written post), sounds like you might attract more problems cuz of the way you think/worry.
I get your point on this. The reason I'm throwing it out here now is so that it isn't any kind of concern in the future. Trust me, I won't in any way be attracting any more attention to myself or speaking more than I should be. If I'm there, I'm there to make it.

Edit: realise now the OP was talking about selection. C'est pas grave...
I was talking about being in the Legion as well. Thanks for the reply.

Now I am not suggesting that you will go as far as waving your passport and shouting that you are American (in Marseille of all places) but what I would suggest is that you eat some humble pie, keep a low profile and not get lured into any discussions on how great America is or is not.
Definitely won't be doing that.

Anyways, I'm expecting to hear back from the Army fairly soon. So I'll update about that and about what my plans are if I get a no-go.
 
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Joseph Cosgrove

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#27
How many times have the French administration (judges, police, préfecture, social workers) and the general population told me “casse-toi”, “rentre chez toi, sale Rosbeef” or “t'es pas de chez nous” (bugger off, go back home bloody Brit, you're not from here)? I have lost count
Ex-legionnaire or not, am still not considered by them. This is a typical, common attitude, among the French. An anti anglophone xénophobie and concerns not just "Yankees", but any buddy who refuses to incline to the French dillusion of being the best at everything... They've done it all, they do it best, they know it best. My hairy arse, they do ! (...)
Hi Andy, I lived several years in France after the Legion and I have to say that I have never experienced anything like what you have described.
 

Le petit caporal

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#28
Working at the US consulate? Try living 15 years in a so-called “quartier sensible”, Beurs, Black and Blanc, same republican schooling and what really boiled my piss, was the 4 years waiting for "them", to deliver my carte de séjour. With a baby in tow and an interdiction de quitter le territoire. No allowance for young child and the rest of the beans (my, that was a tough ride, hardest thing I've ever done in all my life ). My son is now 21 and lives near Larzac, passed his Bac Pro and has applied to join the army (regular). Why not?
 

Joseph Cosgrove

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#29
Working at the US consulate? Try living 15 years in a so-called “quartier sensible”, Beurs, Black and Blanc, same republican schooling and what really boiled my piss, was the 4 years waiting for "them", to deliver my carte de séjour. With a baby in tow and an interdiction de quitter le territoire. No allowance for young child and the rest of the beans (my, that was a tough ride, hardest thing I've ever done in all my life ). My son is now 21 and lives near Larzac, passed his Bac Pro and has applied to join the army (regular). Why not?
Hi Andy, not quite working in the US consulate as such. I was working for G4S and I could have been working anywhere that G4S chose to put me. Before that I was working in different places around Marseille, in security. Can't really offer an opinion on the carte de séjour. It does seem strange the way they have treated an ex-legionnaire.
 

Le petit caporal

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#30
The carte de séjour (residency permit) was established in Marseille. Piquemal had signed my Certificat de Bonne Conduite. I asked, here in Nîmes, the file transfer... Refused by the Préfecture... Had to wait 4 years and going thru associations to obtain eventually the carte de séjour... with the date of the original request 96... It came out in 2006, 1 year after my son's mother death (Ô. D.).. A long story.
Bitterness is omnipresent.
 
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#31
I think it all depends on your mentality. Americans do have that tendency to be stereotyped as rude, obnoxious, and self centered. Personally, I went to school in the US for 7 years (I'm from Mexico) and not once did I felt like I would have a "target on my back" for being Mexican. Sure, I met a few that made dumb comments like "oh do you guys ride burros for transportation?" but I also made a lot of good friends as well.

Same thing when I went abroad for a semester in Germany. The Americans usually end up staying with other Americans and don't bother mingling with others BUT the ones that do are always very friendly and open minded. In my experience, the ones that are out there in the world traveling, seeing, and out of their comfort zone are the ones that get along just fine. The racist/ignorant ones usually never leave their hometown. If you put in the effort to meet people, learn the language and keep an open mind, I think that takes you a long way regardless of your nationality