Chances of deployment

hopingtobe

New Member
Joined
Jun 25, 2013
Messages
8
Reaction score
2
Location
Birkirkara
Best answers
0
Home Country
Malta
Hello lads,

Just a quick question as a lot of conflicting information online and thought better ask the current legionnaires and the 'anciens' with regards to this Q.

Deployments, some say joining the FFL doesn't guarantee a deployment any more, is that regiment specific?Some say 2REP is the best for deployments but others on Reddit are saying those days are long gone and other regs are getting the OPEX.

Hopefully admins fix this new member issue, as it's genuinely saddening to see this forum die by the way. Whatever the media wants to say about the FFL, there's always been a few good lads here which make the forum interesting to have a read on.
 

Joseph Cosgrove

Moderator
Legionnaire
Joined
Jul 13, 2013
Messages
6,185
Reaction score
4,582
Location
Hua Hin Thailand
Best answers
1
Home Country
New Zealand
Hi Hoping,

You can always check out this site: http://foreignlegion.info/?s=deployments

It is no longer true that the REP and the 2 REI are the most deployed. 1 and 2 REG have their fair share and even the the REC. When the REP lost the para tournant in Djibouti, that took away a guaranteed tour. I would say that a lot depends on the government, how much they are willing to send troops to other countries.
At the moment it seems that France's biggest commitment is Mali. What I can tell you about tours is that unless you have a particular speciality such as radio operator then your best bet is staying in a combat company.

Edit :I just noticed your comment in the chat box about subscribing to my channel, Cheers mate. I'm working on a new video called working from home, which is about... well I'm sure that you've worked it out. I was going to give it another week, but I feel that I shouldn't keep my faithful subscribers, all 21 of them :coffee: :whistle:, waiting.
 
Last edited:

dusaboss

Hyper Active Member
Joined
Jun 3, 2016
Messages
4,134
Reaction score
1,363
Location
Serbia
Best answers
0
Home Country
Yugoslavia
Edit :I just noticed your comment in the chat box about subscribing to my channel, Cheers mate. I'm working on a new video called working from home, which is about... well I'm sure that you've worked it out. I was going to give it another week, but I feel that I shouldn't keep my faithful subscribers, all 21 of them :coffee: :whistle:, waiting.
Joe was hot in Djibouti? I mean I know it was, but how hot actualy is? I think I read that training and most things are done in the morning and evening because of unbearable heat during midday
 

Joseph Cosgrove

Moderator
Legionnaire
Joined
Jul 13, 2013
Messages
6,185
Reaction score
4,582
Location
Hua Hin Thailand
Best answers
1
Home Country
New Zealand
Hi Dusa, yes it was very hot. And you're correct most of the training was done early in the morning with a sieste, a nap, obligatory during the hottest period of the day.
In theory.
The wake up call was 04:30 if I remember correctly. In the main camps, you would have your sieste, but on the terrain, it was impossible. Most of the physical activity would stop, but even with an anti heat net, it was still too hot to sleep.

For the CECAP the only thing that was put off was the 8000m run which would start off every commando course. It would start at 05:15 sharp and you had to complete it in less than an hour as you would in any other regiment. The rest of it was like a 'normal' commando course such as you would do in Mt Louis.

Of course by the time you get to the CECAP you are used to the heat. The idea isn't to kill people off. Saying that, when I first got to Djibouti, I had to spend a month working in the infirmerie as a medic while the swimming pool was being built. The 1st cie of the REP had only just arrived and were going to do a jump. Normally the jumps are early morning, for some reason there was a delay. When they eventually boarded there was another delay in the air. To cut a long story short there were somewhere in the region of 20 who were down with heat stroke.
 

voltigeur

Legionnaire
Joined
Oct 17, 2004
Messages
4,321
Reaction score
665
Location
Canada
Best answers
2
Home Country
Canada
That 8 K run, was
Hi Dusa, yes it was very hot. And you're correct most of the training was done early in the morning with a sieste, a nap, obligatory during the hottest period of the day.
In theory.
The wake up call was 04:30 if I remember correctly. In the main camps, you would have your sieste, but on the terrain, it was impossible. Most of the physical activity would stop, but even with an anti heat net, it was still too hot to sleep.

For the CECAP the only thing that was put off was the 8000m run which would start off every commando course. It would start at 05:15 sharp and you had to complete it in less than an hour as you would in any other regiment. The rest of it was like a 'normal' commando course such as you would do in Mt Louis.

Of course by the time you get to the CECAP you are used to the heat. The idea isn't to kill people off. Saying that, when I first got to Djibouti, I had to spend a month working in the infirmerie as a medic while the swimming pool was being built. The 1st cie of the REP had only just arrived and were going to do a jump. Normally the jumps are early morning, for some reason there was a delay. When they eventually boarded there was another delay in the air. To cut a long story short there were somewhere in the region of 20 who were down with heat stroke.
That 8 K run, was that in sports shorts or with gear?
 

Joseph Cosgrove

Moderator
Legionnaire
Joined
Jul 13, 2013
Messages
6,185
Reaction score
4,582
Location
Hua Hin Thailand
Best answers
1
Home Country
New Zealand
Full fighting order. For those that remember the CECAP, it started out a the fusée*, or rocket in English, and finished at the base camp. Which is the reason why it was done at that ungodly sacred hour of 05:15.

* The fusée was its nickname because it was painted red white red, like Tintin's rocket 1603588526847.png except that it was not as elaborated.
 

Le petit caporal

Legionnaire
Joined
Sep 4, 2017
Messages
3,945
Reaction score
2,592
Location
Nimes
Best answers
1
Home Country
North Korea
Any where in Africa i served, the 8 km was always done in trousers...I even did one in tenue 300

Heard on the grape vine that ivory coast is or might be more in the reckoning (due to elections and instability...even if not, Mali and Op Barkhane is a cert
Know dudes who have been three times
Sure, boots, cots and patrol's are easy against an opportunist attack every now and again
Beats pounding Op Sentinel in main land France, imo
Wtf, you still get paid and fed
 

Joseph Cosgrove

Moderator
Legionnaire
Joined
Jul 13, 2013
Messages
6,185
Reaction score
4,582
Location
Hua Hin Thailand
Best answers
1
Home Country
New Zealand
Things are only hotting up in North Africa, whether it be NATO or buggering around the Sahel. I'm sure you'll get a Opex.
Good point on the OPEX, although let's not get OPEX and tournant confused. The first one is what it's all about Operations! And the second is 'routine' but it is still being deployed overseas. I mean let's say someone who is coming from a first world country such as the US, OZ, NZ and the UK. What are the chances of them seeing Africa? I'm not talking about an Organized Safari in Kenya. OK, there may not be much going on in the Ivory Coast, but how many of your mates (obviously I'm not referring to you Snafu) have been, or even know where it is?
Even though you are on a tournant you are still Operational, ready to be to be deployed Look at Pink Floyd, who was lavishing it up is Djibouti (perhaps lavishing it up is the wrong term) before being told to get his kit together as he was going to Somalia.
 

Pink Floyd

New Member
Legionnaire
Joined
Nov 2, 2017
Messages
378
Reaction score
1,016
Location
Australia
Best answers
0
Home Country
Australia
Good point on the OPEX, although let's not get OPEX and tournant confused. The first one is what it's all about Operations! And the second is 'routine' but it is still being deployed overseas. I mean let's say someone who is coming from a first world country such as the US, OZ, NZ and the UK. What are the chances of them seeing Africa? I'm not talking about an Organized Safari in Kenya. OK, there may not be much going on in the Ivory Coast, but how many of your mates (obviously I'm not referring to you Snafu) have been, or even know where it is?
Even though you are on a tournant you are still Operational, ready to be to be deployed Look at Pink Floyd, who was lavishing it up is Djibouti (perhaps lavishing it up is the wrong term) before being told to get his kit together as he was going to Somalia.
Joe, the deployment to Somalia happened within a matter of days. We were on company tour in Djibouti (Arta) at the time. A little unknown fact is that we were on standby to jump just north of Mogadishu if the US had problems taking the airport. There were trucks full of parachutes at Djibouti airport. Photos: our arrival at Mogadishu, and tools of the trade on a bed in Arta before our departure...
 

Attachments

dusaboss

Hyper Active Member
Joined
Jun 3, 2016
Messages
4,134
Reaction score
1,363
Location
Serbia
Best answers
0
Home Country
Yugoslavia
... And Serbia.
Sorry about that, mate.
No, we are under that cold war categorization third world country. Which means we didn't sign up with any of blocks. Because lot of countries from that category was poor African and middle eastern countries term remained as term for all poor countries.
Second world countries should be countries of ex Warsaw pact, but you never hear someone use term second world countries.
First world countries should be NATO countries from cold war era. Don't know about new NATO members. Do they by joining NATO automatically become first world countries from being third or second world?
By Joe Cos categorization first world countries are only English speakers minus Canada. Why you don't like Canada Joe? French official language too? :)

Anyway modern usage of this categorization literally means first world- countries where everything is great, happy and gay and third world are crappy, dirty, poor countries war is war, was war or it would be war.
That separation of courts (people) on first class and third is really disgusting to me. So people from third world country are not even second, but third class?
 

dusaboss

Hyper Active Member
Joined
Jun 3, 2016
Messages
4,134
Reaction score
1,363
Location
Serbia
Best answers
0
Home Country
Yugoslavia
Do they celebrate Halloween in Serbia?
Enough said on the subject :coffee: :whistle:

:love:;):ROFLMAO:
Actually people start in recent years to celebrate Halloween. Probable as part of Americanization process and fashion because we didn't had that tradition before.
We had trick or treats earlier, but was done on Christmas Eve
 

Most viewed threads of the week

Top