Clandestine operations

Joseph Cosgrove

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#21
(...) I don't think it's true though. ;)
Then why repeat it? Who would believe that legionnaires were sent to recover “documents that incriminated France in violating trade embargoes.” If you haven't seen it or experienced it personally it's best not to repeat it.,
It kinda reminds me of the guy who was talking about “WW2 Gestapo” type of interrogations in Aubagne. :rolleyes:
 

dusaboss

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#22
I was speaking to a Marine some time ago that was stationed in Iraq about his opinion of the foreign Legion. He mentioned he encountered a legion unit deployed in Iraq and spoke on his impression of the unit before meandering about why they were deployed to Iraq. He claimed that one of the soldiers told him they were there to recover documents that incriminated France in violating trade embargoes. The Marine went on to describe recovering French produced weapons later in his operation saying it must have been true.

I don't think it's true though. ;)
Probably isn't true, the guys boasted a little. Violating trade weapons embargoes is probably true, there is many of that shady business around. But they are not stupid to make documents which will incriminate France in first place. There is well organized schemes have that is done. There is no way you can legally connect strong country as France with weapons. You can watch "Lord of War" I think they are pretty close to reality.

I was surprised to hear that my country doing a lot of that business considering Serbia's size and power
 
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#23
I was a member of the SF club for 21 years + and I met many operators. They went there to wind down and have a drink with their mates. They seldom discussed any operations and only with those specifically involved. I very rarely heard anything from the SAS boys. My limited info came from the SBS who knew me. Even on the President's evening (First Thursday of every month) most people did not discuss ops. It was also a watering hole for those in the security industry who had been security vetted. My membership No was; 5*3* in 1980. Secretary. Mike Reynolds, MC former Captain in the Rhodesian LRDG.
 

SnafuSmite

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#24
My step brother is ex-South African SF and I've met quite a few of his ex colleagues, and one things for sure the guys that talk big stories either weren't there or are talking shite....plain and simple. They used to joke about it and say they knew bullshite was coming when a guy would say "when I was in SF....."
 

dusaboss

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#25
Hmmmm? If I may with all due respect ....f*ck SF. I always felt some hostility (not a right word, can't find better).
Just my 2 cents. If someone don't like it... :)
 
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#27
Hmmmm? If I may with all due respect ....f*ck SF. I always felt some hostility (not a right word, can't find better).
Just my 2 cents. If someone don't like it... :)
Dusaboss,
No doubt this is why you wish to join the FFL. The due respect is missing, so do tell us why? Did they lift you some early morning for your misdeeds or is your sentiment a figment of your imagination? When are you actually going to the gates as a Legion candidate? :unsure:
Take care, good luck and kind regards from me. ;)
 

dusaboss

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#28
Humm... Yes. Do you want to talk about it? :unsure:
Not a hostility, arrogance is a right word. Many SF guys are bit arrogant (of course not all of them) thinking they are so much better than regulars. And they are better, but modesty is big part in being great, characteristic many of them lack.
I watched some SEAL trainings. Seems to me that they teach them that kind of behavior. Some of them think that one SF guy (especially from their unit) is worth same as 20 regular soldier which is total BS.

Chas, this does not apply to you. You are OK. Also looks that many British SF are much more down to earth in comparison with Americans and Serbians.

(...) Did they lift you some early morning for your misdeeds or is your sentiment a figment of your imagination? (...)
Who SF guys? Nahh, I'm not that caliber, only regular police lifted me early morning. ;)

(...) When are you actually going to the gates as a Legion candidate? :unsure: (...)
When I grow up.
 
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#29
Dusaboss,

In a way you are correct. The SF sometimes do regard themselves to be superior beings. However no unit however sophisticated can survive in combat with others of a different skill set.

In my days the SBS who were infinitely less boastful than the SAS came under the orbit of a Maj. Gen. RM. SF. Unlike the SAS after a tour or two they returned to the RM and passed on their skill set to those in Commando Brigade. Now other than the Ruperts who went to the SAS to have it on their CVs' the NCOs' stayed for life with the regiment. This meant their skills did not permeate down to the Army per se.

The SBS have always been modest. Now they come under the orbit of the Director SF. This post rotates between an Army officer and a RM officer. They are still modest and seldom on retirement write books extolling their military prowess. They have to pass SF training and will not be badged until they have passed their arduous SC training. If they fail they are eligible for the SAS. Training is held twice annually by a joint team of SAS and SBS invigilators.

Another point the Army maintains that they are treated far better when serving with the RM rather than the Parachute Regiment who tend to look down on them. No ‘guerre des boutons’ but a simple fact.
 
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#31
I found what I was looking for and it was quite the eye-opener. I should have realized it all along. The one person who used a word that got me going in the right direction - subterfuge. My Thanks to that man.
Clemson
 
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mark wake

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#35
Dusaboss,

In a way you are correct. The SF sometimes do regard themselves to be superior beings. However no unit however sophisticated can survive in combat with others of a different skill set.

In my days the SBS who were infinitely less boastful than the SAS came under the orbit of a Maj. Gen. RM. SF. Unlike the SAS after a tour or two they returned to the RM and passed on their skill set to those in Commando Brigade. Now other than the Ruperts who went to the SAS to have it on their CVs' the NCOs' stayed for life with the regiment. This meant their skills did not permeate down to the Army per se.

The SBS have always been modest. Now they come under the orbit of the Director SF. This post rotates between an Army officer and a RM officer. They are still modest and seldom on retirement write books extolling their military prowess. They have to pass SF training and will not be badged until they have passed their arduous SC training. If they fail they are eligible for the SAS. Training is held twice annually by a joint team of SAS and SBS invigilators.

Another point the Army maintains that they are treated far better when serving with the RM rather than the Parachute Regiment who tend to look down on them. No ‘guerre des boutons’ but a simple fact.
Hhmm. No Guerre des boutons. The paras were always trained to be aggressive! Sometimes I think it was also our downfall! Arnhem a good example! Bloody Sunday a sad example. But then we had generals /politicians who used us in the wrong way! Regardless. The Royal Marines have my respect had many a good scrap and a beer with them. Be well Charles.
 

Rapace

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#36
I think it should be good to explain what guerre des boutons, an expression often used by our friend Chas, exactly means. “La guerre des boutons” is originally a novel written in 1912 by author Louis Pergaud (check here). In the French Army the term is used to describe the (often childish or pointless) rivalries or bickering between different Army branches, since the buttons on the dress uniform display the emblem of the branch, as shown below...

Boutons d'uniformes.png
 

Joseph Cosgrove

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#37
One thing which is quite drole, is that in second hand clothes shops (friperie in French) which are quite common nowadays among the young, you can often buy ex-army jackets with their original buttons for only a couple of euros. some of them are worth a bit of money.
 
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#38
One thing which is quite drole, is that in second hand clothes shops (friperie in French) which are quite common nowadays among the young, you can often buy ex-army jackets with their original buttons for only a couple of euros. some of them are worth a bit of money.
Joe sadly very true. Certain Regimental museums sell and sold badges. The RM museum were selling commando flashes, para wings and various special qualification flashes. It was abused. Now you have to buy via the RM shop and often with proof of service. We have Walts galore.:mad:
 

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