Curiosity.

dusaboss

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Yes if on a ship and you go into the Artic Circle everyone not already a Blue Nose goes through the Navy's Hazing. Also, if at the Equator you get your Shell Back Certificate, a big deal, and a nice on too. Finally, transiting the ditch, the Suez same applies. Damned Navy always finds a good excuse for hazing. Still today, the only form of hazing allowed in the Navy/ Marine Corps, "Official" that is. The other hazing continues to this day, all Marines know what it is to be "Blood Stripped" once you get to the Rank of Corporal.
With all do respect, but do you get medal for that or just certificate?
 
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I heard New sailors get the Golden rivet 🤔
 

Le petit caporal

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The prison in the film, Mid night Express is actually a navy hospital in Malta
My father was locked up there
 

Crawdad

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With all do respect, but do you get medal for that or just certificate?
For Arctic service: Navy and Marine Corps personnel get a ribbon; Air Force personnel get a device* on a ribbon; Coast Guard personnel get a medal; and the Army has no specific award. However, soldiers are technically eligible to receive the Navy/USMC Arctic if they meet the criteria while attached to the USN/USMC-- which almost never happens. (In 13 years, I only met one dude who had this ribbon, but he was "blue-to-green"-- former Air Force or Navy guys who switch branches).
5014

(L-R: Coast Guard Arctic Service Medal; Air Force Overseas Ribbon (Short Tour) with "A"[Arctic] device*; Navy/USMC Arctic Service Ribbon)


As for Shellbacks (Marines and Sailors who cross the equator while at sea), it's a certificate.

* Devices are little metallic letters, numbers, and symbols attached to ribbons and medals that denote various things; most commonly, they indicate multiple awards of the same ribbon/medal.
 

Crawdad

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What you call, 'Devices', we call them Agrafes.
Interesting. Does the term Agrafe also refer to the stars on, say, a Croix de la Valeur Militaire, or is it just for the clasps on your campaign medals (like a MĂ©daille d'Outre-Mer)?
BTW, those clasps fecking rock; I'm low key jealous that we don't really use them. Instead, we get service/campaign stars on our campaign medals, which don't denote which campaign(s) you took part in, and are confusing, to boot.
 

Le petit caporal

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The Agrafes are informative distinctions. On my silver Défense Nationale medal (it's very rare for a caporal to hold the silver but am not just any kind of Caporal) I have Infanterie, Légion étrangère and Mission d'assistance extérieure. On the OM I have Tchad.
 

jonny

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I got 3 stars on my VM (Croix de Valeur Militaire), which means I was awarded the medal 3 times. These agrafes also indicate at which level your award was issued: Bronze star for regiment and brigade, Silver star for division, gold star for army corps and palm for army. Mine are bronze for the first one and silver for the other two.

If you get wounded in action you are automatically entitled to wear an “insigne des blessés”, where you wear a red star for each time you have been wounded. I got one star on mine.

On my campagne medal I have agrafe “Algérie”. There are no agrafes for the Médaille Militaire. It is only issued once to a qualifying recipient, and not available for officers (I also got one of those).

But then again, I was no ordinary légionnaire de Première Classe, as the Caporal might have put it. I will again attach the pic of the most important French medals. I think the one the Capo refers to is the last one on the second row, but I can be mistaken, of course. We didn’t have those when I served.

E7BE61EA-9FC8-4AEF-AA45-A429680B4188.jpeg
 

Le petit caporal

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(...) I think the one the Capo refers to is the last one on the second row, but I can be mistaken, of course. We didn’t have those when I served. (...)
Correct for the DĂ©fense nationale, it's the last one on the second row.
 

Rapace

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(...) These agrafes also indicate at which level your award was issued: Bronze star for regiment and brigade, Silver star for division, gold star for army corps and palm for army. Mine are bronze for the first one and silver for the other two. (...)
Let's clarify a bit. There are two different things here : stars and palms will give the “level” of the citation associated with the decoration. Bronze star for a citation “à l'ordre du régiment” or “à l'ordre de la brigade”, silver “à l'ordre de la division” or vermeil (silver-gilt) “à l'ordre du corps d'armée”. A bronze palm will be for a citation “à l'ordre de l'armée” (highest level) and a silver palm is used to replace 5 bronze palms.
Agrafes (bars) are information only. For example, someone having received the Médaille Coloniale (now called Médaille d'Outre-Mer) for serving in Indochina will have the Indochine bar on the ribbon, someone having received it for the Algeria campaign will have Algérie and of course if someone fought both campaigns, they'll get the two bars. The bars can also be used, for some decorations, to specify the branch you belong(ed) to, like in the example given by Napoleon (Le Petit Caporal :) ) with his Médaille de la Défense Nationale having the Légion étrangère bar. Mine has
Troupes aéroportées.
 

jonny

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Yes, Rapace, I know all that, but didn’t bother correcting the Capo’s definitions. Just another small detail is that each level of citation is signed by a general/colonel at the proper level of command. For example at a citation “à l'ordre de la division” will be signed by a général de division, which I think should correspond to a Major General in the British/US system, but I could be wrong about that.
 

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