Declared dead in absentia.

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Hello all, if I am declared dead in absentia by my country, will I get affected by anything while in the Legion (in case I succeed in joining). My country has a law which a missing person who vanished for more than 3 years will be considered "Dead" but of course if the person returns, he/she can return to living status, but I plan to leave for France without telling anyone and cut off all contact with my family members, relatives and friends since all of them are crap anyway and I don't want to return to my country after 5 years just to go to court and ask to return the living status. My country also has a vague law which stated a Vietnamese citizen can not join a mercenary group or become a mercenary (I already know that FFL is no mercenary force at all but I think if I return to my country, they can be hassle a lot).
 
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Le Caporal is correct, put it behind you. You will not be "Minh" from Vietnam anymore, just as I will not be "Wanderer" from Texas. You will be legionnaire, and you can start over and be a new man.
 
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Apply for French citizenship still accept me even I am considered Dead? lol...Neat!
 

SnafuSmite

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apply for French citizenship still accept me even I am considered Dead? lol...Neat!
You won't be able to apply for citizenship, you will have to be “rectified” first, and that requires you to prove your real name, which is dead. If you're lucky you'll the highest rank you'll get is caporal-chef and you'll be stuck in the Legion until you pop or go to Puyloubier.
 
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thanks for advices guys, I think I will keep relationship with one of my old friend and ask the guy to anoynimously call my parents so they can report to the authority I am still alive and not get myself f*cked up with the death certificate
 
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Rapace

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If you get accepted in the Legion, being declared “dead in absentia” by the Vietnamese authorities is irrelevant as long as you serve under identité déclarée (Legion Id), so no need to worry about that. However, you need to have a clear view on your long-term objectives. Is your plan to just do a 5-year stint in the Legion and move back to Vietnam, do you want to stay in France, do you want to request French citizenship? As Snafusmite put it, before you want to receive French citizenship, you'll need to prove and recover your real identity (that's what is called “Régularisation de Situation Militaire”). If you can't get any paper from your home country because you've been declared dead, then it might be an issue. If you have a means of avoiding being declared dead, that would probably saves you quite a lot of admin hassle.
 
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thank you for your reply, Rapace, I plan for 8 years and I decided that I will keep contact with a friend so he can contact my parents anoynimously and spread rumour as well. If it was easy to disappear like in the medieval age then it would save me alot in this paperwork issue
 

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If you get accepted in the Legion, being declared “dead in absentia” by the Vietnamese authorities is irrelevant as long as you serve under identité déclarée (Legion Id), so no need to worry about that. However, you need to have a clear view on your long-term objectives. Is your plan to just do a 5-year stint in the Legion and move back to Vietnam, do you want to stay in France, do you want to request French citizenship? As Snafusmite put it, before you want to receive French citizenship, you'll need to prove and recover your real identity (that's what is called “Régularisation de Situation Militaire”). If you can't get any paper from your home country because you've been declared dead, then it might be an issue. If you have a means of avoiding being declared dead, that would probably saves you quite a lot of admin hassle.
Rapace, what if you show up at the gates with a duly issued recognized passport and birth certificate in French, within 6 months of joining? Do you still have to prove whom you are, seems pointless, you have self identified up front and the Legion makes all assume an alias. So, it is useless, or pointless is it not? I mean you are offered a "second chance to begin a new life, but not really."
 

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Rapace, what if you show up at the gates with a duly issued recognized passport and birth certificate in French, within 6 months of joining? Do you still have to prove whom you are, seems pointless, you have self identified up front and the Legion makes all assume an alias. So, it is useless, or pointless is it not? I mean you are offered a "second chance to begin a new life, but not really."
Rules re identity upon enlistment in the Legion are regularly changing... At certain times, you could choose to join under your real Id or get a Legion Id, then adopting a Legion Id became mandatory, then facultative again and nowadays it seems like there's been in the last 3-4 years another twist and that Id change is again mandatory upon enlistment. This situation of serving under an identité déclarée will last until the legionnaire can get “rectified” (i.e. until he has officially recovered his real Id).
Per what we know, the RSM (Régularisation de Situation Militaire) process cannot be started before 1 or 1½ year after enlistment and by French rules, very often, copies of the official documents (birth certificate, marriage certificate, etc.) that one is required to provide for some formalities must be less than 3 months old. Don't ask me why, I don't know. While I can make an educated guess for some type of documents (like a marriage certificate, since you can divorce or your spouse can pass away, resulting in a change in your marital status), for others I don't understand the reason for that. If we take the example of the birth certificate, it's pretty obvious that your date and place of birth, names of your parents, etc. are not subject to change, but that's how it is.
So even if a legionnaire joins with all his Id papers, he may have to prove again his identity if/when he decides after 12, 18 months or more in the Legion to start the RSM process.
 

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Rapace, what if you show up at the gates with a duly issued recognized passport and birth certificate in French, within 6 months of joining? Do you still have to prove whom you are, seems pointless, you have self identified up front and the Legion makes all assume an alias. So, it is useless, or pointless is it not? I mean you are offered a "second chance to begin a new life, but not really."
That was the way it was in my time. I signed up with my true identity, but because the age of majority in The Netherlands was 22 years of age at that time, they made me two years older.
Also, then you could not start reverting to your true identity before three years. There was no need for more paperwork, just applied for it and the legion did the rest.
 

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Let's keep in mind, the importance that the Judiciary has taken in our XXIst century societies. And, re the Legion, the difference with the situation prevailing 50+ years ago is further amplified by the fact that at that time the Legion was at war and often based in remote locations that were practically out of reach of the civilian legal system. So, basically, the Legion could organise itself and make their own rules, with little risk of being challenged or questioned by a judge. This has completely changed.
 

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Hello all, if I am declared dead in absentia by my country, will I get affected by anything while in the Legion (in case I succeed in joining). My country has a law which a missing person who vanished for more than 3 years will be considered "Dead" but of course if the person returns, he/she can return to living status, but I plan to leave for France without telling anyone and cut off all contact with my family members, relatives and friends since all of them are crap anyway and I don't want to return to my country after 5 years just to go to court and ask to return the living status. My country also has a vague law which stated a Vietnamese citizen can not join a mercenary group or become a mercenary (I already know that FFL is no mercenary force at all but I think if I return to my country, they can be hassle a lot).
How will you get to France ?
 
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Let's keep in mind, the importance that the Judiciary has taken in our XXIst century societies. And, re the Legion, the difference with the situation prevailing 50+ years ago is further amplified by the fact that at that time the Legion was at war and often based in remote locations that were practically out of reach of the civilian legal system. So, basically, the Legion could organise itself and make their own rules, with little risk of being challenged or questioned by a judge. This has completely changed.
The world will eventually collapse because there are so many rules and jurisdictions. Just words on paper
 

Surfguy

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So the airport in Vietnam will log you leaving , so much for disappearing. :rolleyes:
 

Rapace

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So the airport in Vietnam will log you leaving , so much for disappearing. :rolleyes:
Well... I don't see where the contradiction is. He could be logged as leaving by the Vietnamese customs officers and – if I understood well what Minh said – later declared “dead in absentia”, if he hasn't given any sign of life after 3 years.
Vietnam being still under a Communist regime, that could be a way of discouraging their citizens to emigrate, without prohibiting it outright, like in the old days of the “Iron Curtain”. Just a wild guess...
 
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You are correct in this matter, Rapace. The government pretty much wants to control its citizens' movement overseas, they still have problem with the exiled South Vietnamese in the US and Europe and they want less of their citizens to flee to the exiled side. While other countries will allow a longer time before declaring missing people dead (like 10, 20 years or even declare them dead only if human remains are found), my country only gives 3 years.
And Surfguy, I know this is not like medieval age, this is modern age, government know everything and beside I am not away from authority or anything, just want to be "unheard" by my family and relatives.
 
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Surfguy

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Well... I don't see where the contradiction is. He could be logged as leaving by the Vietnamese customs officers and – if I understood well what Minh said – later declared “dead in absentia”, if he hasn't given any sign of life after 3 years.
Vietnam being still under a Communist regime, that could be a way of discouraging their citizens to emigrate, without prohibiting it outright, like in the old days of the “Iron Curtain”. Just a wild guess...
But the authorities will know he left and is most likely still over outside Vietnam and it appears its the authorities he`s trying to fool, if he can get over the boarder into Laos or Thailand on foot without using a boarder crossing no one will know.
 

Rapace

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Sexpert, Petit Caporal and al., I'd suggest you to take your interesting political discussions offline, what do you think ?
 
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