Food Deprivation

mark wake

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Yeah and he said he'll let the mighty greens answer that question because he wasn't in the Legion he was Royal Marine Commando where he had food deprivation in commando training....I think your question is too broad because the Legion overall doesn't do food deprivation. But there is probably some training where they have to endure lack of food like maybe in jungle training or some other training where they have to find and prepare food as part of training but my assumption is that they give atleast one MRE a day in all training...but I'm not sure for certain so I think someone that was in the Legion could answer better.
The Royal Marines are good lads but do have a tendency to land on the wrong beach!😉
 

mark wake

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Hi Volt, it has been literally years since I visited you web site, would you mind posting a link to it?
Funny lot the cavalry😉remember one time in Salisbury plain uk.digging bloody foxholes. we were told we had full support from a cavalry squadron. When our sgt heard that. dig deeper lads!😆 he said! Finally they rolled up one of them just missing the foxhole me and a mate were in. The hatch opened up and the bloody officer in his best Sandhurst voice... we are here chaps let’s get going shall we! Good show!! The para next to me shook his head and rolled his 👀 stick the SLR up his arse mate! I almost did but we just wanted to get the bloody maneuver over with! We always made fun of them. and it was much the same in the legion. But in any army the full support of all units is vital. Doesn’t matter the regiment. No regrets!😉
 
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Never he must have been a Para on attachment.:)

Truth to tell it was. Reason being matelots provided him with wrong charts. Possibly they did not like him. Rather like dropping an oyster in the soup of a disliked officer by wardroom staff.
 

jwaltos

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During a mission profonde I lost 30 lbs. I was about 6'2", 210 lbs. with lean muscle when we started. Being the radio guy I carried the BLU (and some other gear for a quick set up) both in and out whereas the food porters..etc.. had nearly empty sacks on the way out. When we arrived in St. Georges in the early evening and had our first "cafeteria style" meal I remember having two bowls of soup, bread and maybe a couple of other small things before going to bed. I was in agony for the next 3 to 4 hours because my stomach had shrunk and I had eaten too much. The coffee was good in the morning though. We were in for about a month. We were rationed but not deprived.

During this "promenade touristique" one of the food porters was discovered to have stolen some food and a Sgt. beat him with a log a little after daybreak midway through the walk. Along with an emergency evacuation or two, regular reporting back to Forget via morse I always made a point of capturing Radio France in the morning for everyone when possible. Raising everyone's spirits is sometimes more important than having some food in your belly.

Regarding the initial question, there were times we ate very little but some of the rations (chewy sticks like Tootsie Rolls) we did have were supposedly full of nutrients..we also had to eat our little pills, Chloroquine and Nivaquine, which could be considered as food (they also caused memory loss).
 
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During a mission profonde I lost 30 lbs. I was about 6'2", 210 lbs. with lean muscle when we started. Being the radio guy I carried the BLU (and some other gear for a quick set up) both in and out whereas the food porters..etc.. had nearly empty sacks on the way out. When we arrived in St. Georges in the early evening and had our first "cafeteria style" meal I remember having two bowls of soup, bread and maybe a couple of other small things before going to bed. I was in agony for the next 3 to 4 hours because my stomach had shrunk and I had eaten too much. The coffee was good in the morning though. We were in for about a month. We were rationed but not deprived.

During this "promenade touristique" one of the food porters was discovered to have stolen some food and a Sgt. beat him with a log a little after daybreak midway through the walk. Along with an emergency evacuation or two, regular reporting back to Forget via morse I always made a point of capturing Radio France in the morning for everyone when possible. Raising everyone's spirits is sometimes more important than having some food in your belly.

Regarding the initial question, there were times we ate very little but some of the rations (chewy sticks like Tootsie Rolls) we did have were supposedly full of nutrients..we also had to eat our little pills, Chloroquine and Nivaquine, which could be considered as food (they also caused memory loss).
Good to see you back. Trust you are well. Kind regards-Chas.
 
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