Green Street Holligans

Scouser

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Support Liverpool - like me. We`are turning Chinese it seems. Now there's a future !
Ha Ha - the Red's are taking over China :D

I remember watching a documentary on the Legion where the cie was sitting around a camp fire one night. Each of them had to sing a song from their own country and the only song the only English guy (a manc) could sing was some Man. U. Terrace chant. You could see the whole mood of the rest instantly drop. I think they had some experience of "les hooligans Anglaise." The manc later deserted - of course!

To hear some REALLY creative insults go to a derby match or Liverpool/Man U match. Some of the ones about Stevie G. and his wife are hilarious! - especially with 60,000 all singing it in unison!

Rob - if you still think it all sounds like fun google "Heysel". Then google Hillsborough .
 

Brad Eldergar

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We don't have that kind of football level in Sweden (however, some of my old mates would like us to). Of course I played the game like every other kid in my country, but lost touch with after leaving my teens. However, all this writing got me to check the film suggestions (again). Ruined me of some well needed sleep for a couple of nights. Also, remember now that I, as a football ignorant idiot at the age of 27 (at that age one should know better), got tickets to the game England v Sweden at old Wembley in 1999. At that time I was working (more like trying...) as a trainee at the Swedish embassy in London (for the record I missed that career path). I was so f...ing stupid that I went to the game via the tube with a jacket and cuff links with the Swedish "coat of arms" trying to look like a Swedish/English gentleman. Already in the tube I realised that perhaps in the future I should try to keep a low profile. Sweden lost - luckily said some of my colleagues. Otherwise there may have been more Swedish citizens involved in trouble which always was a concern for the Embassy staff.

Not sure my tribute to this thread is any good but there u go (having a couple of pints and the urge to write something, anything, is to great:eek:).

/ Brad

Ah, awake after beauty sleep (well...), I also remember.
Being a Junior at the Embassy I got the opportunity to "work" - being the "speaker" introducing the Swedish team via the speaker system sitting with some of the football managing staff at that match at old Wembley. As I already posted I did not know f..k about football any more so I foolishly declined and the opportunity got to my 2 yr younger colleague with a typical silly Swedish/English embarrassing accent. That fat, at that time, colleague hardly ever did any sports, but he was football updated (not hard when comparing with me). Never got forgiven coming home and telling my friends.

But, my point with this is: the reason the English football mangers (promoter or whatever) turned to the Embassy at all was the fact that they, at that time, was not on speaking terms with their Swedish equivalent. REASON: English supporters wrecked havoc at an earlier match in Sweden and they were to far from reaching an economic agreement after that. LESSON: English supporters can be, hrm, well, a bit dangerous:)
/ Brad
 

Bags

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Thought some of you might find this interesting...


United Kingdom

Throughout the 1970s and 1980s, the UK had a reputation worldwide for football hooliganism; the phenomenon was often dubbed the English Disease. However, the UK government has led a widescale crackdown on football related violence. While football hooliganism has been a growing concern in some other European countries in recent years, British football fans now tend to have a better reputation abroad. Although reports of British football hooliganism still surface, the instances now tend to occur at pre-arranged locations rather than at the matches themselves.

[edit] England
Football hooliganism in England dates back to the 1880s, when what were termed as roughs caused trouble at football matches.[5] Local derby matches would usually have the worst trouble, but in an era when travelling fans were not common, roughs would sometimes attack the referees and the away team's players.[70] In the early 1980s, many British hooligans started wearing expensive European designer clothing, to avoid attracting the attention of authorities. This led to the development of the casual subculture. Clothing lines popular with British casuals have included: Pringle, Fred Perry, Le Coq Sportif, Aquascutum, Burberry, Lacoste, Timberland, Lonsdale, Sergio Tacchini, Ben Sherman, Ralph Lauren, Fjallraven, Barbour, Section 60, Paul and Shark, C.P. Company and Stone Island.

During the 1970s, organised hooligan firms started to emerge with clubs such as Arsenal (Gooners, The Herd) Birmingham City (Zulus), Derby County (Derby Lunatic Fringe) Barnet (Northern Line Service), Chelsea (Headhunters), Everton FC (County Road Cutters) (Barnet B.U.G), Leeds United (Leeds Service Crew), Middlesbrough FC(Middlesbrough Frontline), Queens Park Rangers (C Mob, Ellerslie Enders), Burnley FC (The Suicide Squad), Liverpool FC (The Urchins), Manchester City (Guvnors, Young Guvnors, Mayne Line Service Crew), Manchester United (Red Army), Portsmouth (6.57 Crew), Sheffield United (Blades Business Crew), Tottenham Hotspur (Yid Army), and West Ham United (Inter City Firm). Lower league clubs also had firms, such as Blackpool's Rammy Arms Crew, |Stevenage fc SFC Youth, and of course Millwall (Bushwackers), Sunderland AFC (The Vauxies, Seaburn Casuals, Stoke City (Naughty Forty), and Ipswich Town (Ipswich Punishment Squad). Two main events in 1973 led to introduction of crowd segregation and fencing at football grounds in England.[71] Manchester United were relegated to the Second Division, the Red Army caused mayhem at grounds up and down the country, and a Bolton Wanderers fan stabbed a young Blackpool fan to death behind the Kop at Bloomfield Road during a Second Division match.[72]

The so-called relegation battle of White Hart Lane, when Tottenham Hotspur and Chelsea fans fought on the pitch after Spurs relegated Chelsea in 1975, made national news when shown on the BBC television programme John Craven's Newsround.

In March 1978, a full-scale riot broke out at The Den during an FA Cup quarter-final between Millwall and Ipswich. Fighting began on the terraces, then spilled out on to the pitch and into the narrow streets around the ground. Bottles, knives, iron bars, fists, boots and concrete slabs rained from the sky. Dozens of innocent people were injured. In March 1985, hooligans who had attached themselves to Millwall were involved in large-scale rioting at Luton when Millwall played Luton Town in the quarter final of the FA Cup. Prime Minister Margaret Thatcher's immediate response was to set up a "War Cabinet" to combat football hooliganism.[73] On 29 May 1985, 39 Juventus fans were crushed to death during the European Cup Final between Liverpool and Juventus at Heysel Stadium in Brussels; an event that became known as the Heysel Stadium disaster. Just before kick-off, Liverpool fans broke through a line of police officers and ran toward the Juventus supporters in a section of the ground containing both English and Italian fans. When a fence separating them from the Juventus fans was broken through, the English supporters attacked the Italian fans, the majority of whom were families rather than ultras who were situated in the other end of the ground. Many Italians tried to escape the fighting, and a wall collapsed on them.[74][75] As a result of the Heysel Stadium disaster, English clubs were banned from all European competitions until 1990, with Liverpool banned for an additional year.[76]

On 11 May 1985 a 14-year-old boy died at St Andrews stadium when fans were pushed onto a wall by Police which subsequently collapsed following crowd violence at a match between Birmingham City and Leeds United.[77][78] The fighting that day was described by Justice Popplewell, during the Popplewell Committee investigation into football in 1985 as more like "the Battle of Agincourt than a football match".[73][79][80] Because of the other events in 1986 and the growing rise in football hooliganism during the early 1980s, an interim report from the committee stated that "football may not be able to continue in its present form much longer" unless hooliganism was reduced, perhaps by excluding "away" fans.[73]

Margaret Thatcher, UK Prime Minister from 1979 to 1990, made a high-profile public call for the country's football hooligans to be given "stiff" prison sentences to act as a deterrent to others in a bid to clamp down on hooliganism. Her minister for sport, Colin Moynihan, attempted to bring in an ID card scheme for football supporters.

Millwall hooligans were involved in their third high profile incident in decade on January 1988, when in an FA Cup tie against Arsenal at Highbury, 41 people were arrested for rioting.

The government acted after the Hillsborough disaster in 1989, when 96 fans died, bringing in the Football Spectators Act 1989 in the wake of the Taylor Report.[74][75] However, the Hillsborough Justice Campaign states: "the British Judicial system has consistently found that violence or hooliganism played no part whatsoever in the disaster".[76] On 15 February 1995, England played Ireland. English fans started to throw items down into the stand below and rip up seats; after battles broke out between police and English fans, 50 people were injured.

English and German fans have a rivalry dating back to the late 1980s.[81][82][83][84][85][86] After England's defeat to Germany in the Euro 96 semi-finals, a large scale riot took place in Trafalgar square, with a number of injuries. A Russian youth was also stabbed in Brighton, because his attackers mistook him as being German.[87] Other occasional clashes have occurred with a few other teams since the mid 1980s.[88] France 98 was marred by violence as English fans clashed with the North African locals of Marseille, which led to up to 100 fans being arrested.[89]

In the 2000s, English football hooligans often wear either clothing styles that are stereotypically associated with the "[casual]" subculture, such as items made by Shark and Burberry. Prada and Burberry withdrew certain garments over fears that their brands were becoming linked with hooliganism.[90] English hooligans have begun using Internet forums, mobile phones and text messages to set up fight meetings or provoke rival gangs into brawls.[91] Sometimes fight participants post live commentaries on the Internet.[92]

Football violence in British stadiums declined after the introduction of the Football Spectators Act, and in the 2000s much of the trouble occurred away from stadiums or away at major international tournaments.[70] At Euro 2000, the England team was threatened with expulsion from the tournament, due to the poor behaviour of the fans.[93] Following good behaviour in the Korea-Japan 2002 and Portugal 2004, the English reputation has improved.[94] At the 2006 FIFA World Cup in Germany, there were limited incidences of violence, with over 200 preventative arrests in Stuttgart (with only three people being charged with criminal offences) 400 others taken into preventative custody.[95][96] During that day, Police believe that on average each rioter consumed or threw 17 litres of beer.[96]


ok having to do this over 2 posts as too big for just one...soz..
Bags.
 

Bags

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Despite hooliganism declining domestically, death threats by English hooligans have become more common in the 2000s. Rio Ferdinand was the target of death threats from Leeds United fans, as was Peter Ridsdale.[97][98] Swedish referee Anders Frisk quit his position after receiving death threats from Chelsea F.C. fans.[99] Reading players Ibrahima Sonko and Stephen Hunt also received death threats from Chelsea fans in 2006.[100] A steward died after serious clashes between firms from Aston Villa and Queens Park Rangers after a Carling Cup game in September 2004.[101] It has been documented that most English hooligans are in their late teens or early twenties, although it is not uncommon for older hooligans to take part, usually as leaders. They usually come from working class backgrounds, mainly employed in manual or lower clerical occupations, or (to a lesser extent) are working in the grey market or are unemployed.[70]

After some 20 years of relatively good behaviour among English football fans in general, extreme scenes of hooliganism made a comeback at Upton Park on 25 August 2009, when at the Football League Cup second round tie between London rivals West Ham United and Millwall the pitch was invaded several times during the game and rioting in the streets came afterwards, with one incident resulting in a man suffering stab wounds.[1]

There were minor disturbances during and after England's 4-1 defeat to Germany during the 2010 FIFA World Cup. A German flag was burned down amongst a mob of English supporters in Leicester Square in England, as well as damage to a Haagen Daz restaurant within the vicinity. One German fan amongst the crowd was confronted by the mob, but there were no injuries.[102]

A significant number of convicted football hooligans are known to be members of far-right organisations including the National Front, British National Party

Football hooliganism has been depicted in films such as: I.D., The Firm, Cass, The Football Factory, Green Street,Rise of the Footsoldier and Awaydays. There are also many books about hooliganism, such as The Football Factory and Among the Thugs. Some critics argue that these media representations glamorise violence and the hooligan lifestyle

Hope this was of some help....but you know the only way to truly understand any of this....is to actually go a UK footie match...then you'd kinda understand...

Bags
 

Kronenberg

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ZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzz.......................

FCUK me Bags! Did you say all of that without coming up for air?

I sometimes have to ask myself why I prefer male company. Thanks for reminding me.
 

Bags

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Lmao!!! dont go breaking my heart Kron!!! :O

Its called......copy & paste....tis an amazing invention.... :D
 

Private

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Cass Pennant in his book "Congratulations You Have Just Met the ICF"said that one season West Ham compete in Division X with Cardiff(Wales).

Is this true?

Does exist some tournament between clubs from England and Wales?
 

StevenPreece

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I thoroughly enjoyed this film too, aand have watched it many times. However; the follow up film was disappointing.

If you enjoyed Green Street, I would guess you'd also enjoy "Rise of the Foot Soldier".


Steve
 
M

Martin Scott

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**** Me what a load of phiss,
Thank feck I have always been a rugby supporter.
So what do you want to do get your head kicked in or get pissed with the oppision fans sing very crude sioongs and wake up in the morning with nothing more than a hangover.
Ehhhhhhhhhhhhh.......
 

Ex-Pongo

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sorry, both green street and football factory is gash!
got nothing against football violence, if like minded individuals want to meet up and break each other's teeth on a saturday then fill your boots!!
I have a mate in the millwall firm and i actually got invited to join the aberdeen one, not my bag though. football isn't my sport lol

Rise of the footsoldier was good though.

im currently reading 'after the match the game begins' its about the Dundee Utility (their football firm) its the only firm in the world that supports two different teams (dundee fc and dundee utd)
it goes on from when the writer is a fifteen year old kid and how he grows up in the Alliance under 5's

i'll give a better review when i'm done with it.
 
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Pagoda_Warrior

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Football is a complete load of old Bollox..... The players are a bloody disgrace to the meaning of the words Male, man or masculine! The current women teams are far more masculine than their Male counterparts! It's the most metro sexual sport that exists other than equestrian disciplines.

That not to say Vinny Jones, Stuart Pearson and Roy Keane are not genuine Warriors. The rest though are a complete bunch of mincers with their gay boy antics.

Rugby is much more of a gladiatorial spectacle; and yet the Supporters/ Fans don't behave like a bunch of retards.
 
OP
RMD

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**** Me what a load of phiss,
Thank feck I have always been a rugby supporter.
So what do you want to do get your head kicked in or get pissed with the oppision fans sing very crude sioongs and wake up in the morning with nothing more than a hangover.
Ehhhhhhhhhhhhh.......
Is this a joke Martin? I'm sorry mate but isn't what you've described there the life of the legion? Fighting, singing, drinking! Minus the corvee of course.
 
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I'm forever blowing bubbles,
Pretty bubbles in the air,
They fly so high,
'Till they reach the sky,
And like my dreams they fade and die.
Fortunes always hiding,
I've looked everywhere.
I'm forever blowing bubbles,
Pretty bubbles in the aïr.
 

Lewis123

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I'm forever blowing bubbles,
Pretty bubbles in the air,
They fly so high,
'Till they reach the sky,
And like my dreams they fade and die.
Fortunes always hiding,
I've looked everywhere.
I'm forever blowing bubbles,
Pretty bubbles in the aïr.
Do not speak again.......
 
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Martin Scott

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Is this a joke Martin? I'm sorry mate but isn't what you've described there the life of the legion? Fighting, singing, drinking! Minus the corvee of course.
Rob **** off
 

John777

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I watch both, but as rugby cleaned up most of the fighting with harsh fines and match bans, until soccer clears itself of the diving, done in games and practised during training, I would have to agree, soccer is tarnished as a game full of cheaters. Diving sucks. Fifa get serious and ban all divers.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PNi6nafLcsI Probably not the best video but it shows the differing attitudes of those who play both sports, although I prefer rugby without the fighting we had in the pre professional era. I loved it then, but now is better.
 
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Martin Scott

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I watch both, but as rugby cleaned up most of the fighting with harsh fines and match bans, until soccer clears itself of the diving, done in games and practised during training, I would have to agree, soccer is tarnished as a game full of cheaters. Diving sucks. Fifa get serious and ban all divers.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PNi6nafLcsI Probably not the best video but it shows the differing attitudes of those who play both sports, although I prefer rugby without the fighting we had in the pre professional era. I loved it then, but now is better.
John all bloody handbags on the pitch and we get pisshed aftyerwards, sod Soccer.....
 

repman86

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Totally agree with the twa above, rugby is a game played by men, football is a game played by spoiled pre-maddonas who are well over payed and shite role models.
 
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