Hostage situation

Le petit caporal

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Limit your mouvements. No hanging about, just for the sake of hanging about. When you need to do some thing out side, do it and then get back to base.

The Lt-Col Gendarme, who exchanged places with an hostage, has died (just been announced).
 

Rapace

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The gendarmerie officer (not police, I know that for foreigners it's not easy to tell the difference) who turned himself in to the terrorist, Lt-Col Arnaud Beltrame, eventually died last night of the wounds he received. The attacker, Redouane Lakdim, was a recently naturalised French citizen, of Moroccan origins. Typical profile of an unemployed petty criminal living in a suburban ghetto who becomes radicalised on its own and one day decides to die as an Islam martyr... :(
 

Joseph Cosgrove

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One thing for sure, his memory will not be forgotten. If there is one thing (among many others) that France is very good for , they respect those that have fallen for France. The Lt Col, Gendarme did a very courageous gesture. If it hadn't been him, then without a doubt it would have been the civilian hostage.
RIP Mon colonel.
 

dusaboss

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Here is picture of the hero gendarme. Is that FFL emblem (how do you call that) behind him on the map?

1.jpg
 

Rapace

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Here is picture of the hero gendarme. Is that FFL emblem (how do you call that) behind him on the map?
Yes, it's a fanion (a pennant in English) of a Legion veterans association, AALE being the acronym of Association des Anciens de la Légion Étrangère. Probably a gift he has received (Lt-Col Beltrame was not a former legionnaire). The picture must not be very recent because one sees he still has his Major stripes (rank called Chef d'Escadron in the Gendarmerie), so that was before his promotion to Lt-Col.
 

dusaboss

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Bomb just exploded 8 km west of my house in Alexandria
I read that in Serbian news. Target was chief of police. Do they know who did attack?

The gendarmerie officer (not police, I know that for foreigners it's not easy to tell the difference) (...)
It's not hard to tell the difference for me. In Serbia we also have Gendarmerie (many other countries too). I guess Gendarme wouldn't like to be called policeman (pigeon??).
Isn't common mistake in France that all policemen sometimes get called gendarmes?

Yes, it's a fanion (a pennant in English) of a Legion veterans association, AALE being the acronym of Association des Anciens de la Légion Etrangère. Probably a gift he has received (Lt-Col Beltrame was not a former legionnaire). The picture must not be very recent because one sees he still has his Major stripes (rank called Chef d'Escadron in the Gendarmerie), so that was before his promotion to Lt-Col.
I read that he finished Saint-Cyr and that he was two years in Iraq after he was decorated with "military cross" (how they say).
 

Rapace

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I read that he finished Saint-Cyr and that he was two years in Iraq after he was decorated with "military cross" (how they say).
Many confusing information being published... Lt-Col Beltrame started his career in the Army as a reserve officer in an Artillery regiment, then passed in 1999 the selective exam to enter the École Militaire Interarmes (EMIA), different from École Spéciale Militaire de Saint-Cyr (ESM), but located on the same campus. After the EMIA, he chose to join the Gendarmerie and went for further training to the École des Officiers de la Gendarmerie Nationale. After graduating, he was selected to enter one of the components of the GIGN (Groupe d'Intervention de la Gendarmerie Nationale). He became a qualified HALO/HAHO free fall paratrooper (chuteur opérationnel) and was deployed with his unit to Iraq in 2005, where he received the Croix de la Valeur Militaire (Military Valor Cross, shortened VM in French military jargon), with one citation. At the time of his death, he was the 2IC of all Gendarmerie units in the Aude département (district). BTW, Castelnaudary is also located in the Aude, not to far actually (about 50 km) from where the attack took place.
 

Joseph Cosgrove

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Thanks Rapace, I saw a photo of the Lt Col. en tenue and noticed the para wings. Couldn't quite make it out 5 stars perhaps, which would correspond with the HALO/HAHO, chuteur opérationnel status. Bloody terrorists !

As for Carcassone, I went there, in tenue de sortie, while I was doing my fut-fut. I had the weekend off with a guy from the REP who I did instruction with. He was back in Castel to do his sports Monitor's course. The medieval citadel was a bit of a disappointment, all souvenir shops and expensive restaurants, nothing like Calvi ;).
 

Le petit caporal

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4 membres of the CRS Marseille, jogging @ Carcassonne. An individuel drives past and opens fire and wounds one, to the shoulder (I bet, an Audi A3 or VW Golf was used)

Update : a "small" car has been found, belonging to a Moroccan citizen. The hostage taker : armed with a 7.65 and grenade (s). Is the hostage taker, the same person who opened fire on the CRS ?
It was an Opel (which now belongs to PSA, the Peugeot Citroën group). It doesn't surprise me and the reason since German diesel cars are the preference of the thugs from the slums. Every time one drives by me, am on alert max (I have had more than my fair share of hassle from these vermin with cars like that. Lived 15 years amongst the fuds).
 

ZALegion

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With philosophical and religious ideology, the culprits don't mind dying, in fact they see it as an honour and a privilege, all rationale is lost and its always a fight to the death. It's extremely difficult to fight an enemy like that.
Hi SnafuSmite,

I'm just playing devil's advocate here ☺ just so the conversation isn't just one sided and this forum doesn't become some sort of echo chamber. When you get into the Legion I assume you too shall be prepared to die for the ideology that has been prescribed to you? When you are off to battle you will know there is a potential of you meeting your maker and you will accept that and in fact will be (as you said) honoured for your death.

Is it not strange the similarities we choose to overlook? Is not everyone fighting an ideological warfare with each side convinced they are in the right. I get that one side does not intentionally target civilians and have an agreed upon set of rules for battle (Geneva convention).

Idealism has always fascinated me and how do you define a hero, for example Britain helped stop the Nazis from running concentration camps and killing thousands of people because it wasn't right... but they were running the very same concentration camps in Kenya (Mau Mau) and South Africa (Boer concentration camps)! It's crazy the life of a warrior; how the British armed forces fought alongside the Greeks for the right to determine their own destiny until they chose that destiny to be communism than the very same men were sent to fight against their Greek comrades for making the ‘wrong’ decision. Arguing idealism is a dangerous thing, we have to accept that we have merely chosen a side and hope to Merlin we have chosen the right side and that history will remember our choices kindly. Food for thought eh?
 

dusaboss

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Hi SnafuSmite,

I'm just playing devil's advocate here ☺ just so the conversation isn't just one sided and this forum doesn't become some sort of echo chamber. (...)
Really... :) ? Ok, so you decided to defend the twisted ideology of the Islamic State? And by comparing it to the French Foreign Legion?

There are many other sides you could take instead if you wanted to play the Devil's (Shaitan in this case) advocate.

(...) When you get into the Legion I assume you too shall be prepared to die for the ideology that has been prescribed to you? When you are off to battle you will know there is a potential of you meeting your maker and you will accept that and in fact will be (as you said) honoured for your death. (...)
No ! It's not the same, you can't even compare. How many legionnaires are willing to drive a car in a group of children or to blow themselves, kiling as many civilians as they can for “greater” cause.

How many legionnaires hate all those who don't subscribe to the Legion's ideology and think that they should be converted or killed? I mean, the list goes on and on, but I think you’ve got point.

Your main argument is that both legionnaires and Islamists are willing to die for ideology. I think you are wrong on that one. When someone joining FFL he is not going in with a thought “I'm willing to die for FFL and what it stands for”. Recruits simply accept the possibility that they may die in battle and don't whine much about it.

No one (I think so) really joining with thoughts of how would be great to die for FFL. Maybe some of them secretly have death wish (if they say something about it, they would never been accepted), but that has nothing to do with ideology or FFL.

So please, we are not talking here about two sides of same coin. We are talking about different universes.
 

ZALegion

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Really... :) ? Ok, so you decided to defend the twisted ideology of the Islamic State? And by comparing it to the French Foreign Legion?

There are many other sides you could take instead if you wanted to play the Devil's (Shaitan in this case) advocate.

No ! It's not the same, you can't even compare. How many legionnaires are willing to drive a car in a group of children or to blow themselves, kiling as many civilians as they can for “greater” cause.

How many legionnaires hate all those who don't subscribe to the Legion's ideology and think that they should be converted or killed? I mean, the list goes on and on, but I think you’ve got point.

Your main argument is that both legionnaires and Islamists are willing to die for ideology. I think you are wrong on that one. When someone joining FFL he is not going in with a thought “I'm willing to die for FFL and what it stands for”. Recruits simply accept the possibility that they may die in battle and don't whine much about it.

No one (I think so) really joining with thoughts of how would be great to die for FFL. Maybe some of them secretly have death wish (if they say something about it, they would never been accepted), but that has nothing to do with ideology or FFL.

So please, we are not talking here about two sides of same coin. We are talking about different universes.
Good Afternoon Dusaboss

You seem to have taken my argument on idealism personally and maybe missed it a bit. By my prefasing the argument I was avoiding just this. I have not in any way defended extremists please reread my post for better understanding. I specifically mention that the Legion is governed by the Geneva accord and that they are not willing to intentionally harm civilians for their cause. I cannot speak on the recruitment process of the extremists as I have not invested much time on its research, but I've always thought it funny that for people proclaiming to not be afraid of death they do spend an awful amount of time hiding from death?!

On your argument on idealism you are merely arguing semantics my friend. Being prepared to die for an idea is being prepared to die for an idea whether you ride in on a donkeys back in Jerusalem or do it in hope of imagined virgins in the sky. Your retort somewhat argues my point for me, your conviction of "your" side being the right one is I assume the very same way the people you consider opposed to you feel....ironical isn't it (and that was my point).
 
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Le petit caporal

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A failed attempt to kill french soldiers this morning has happened. ..will post updates when i learn more
 

Joseph Cosgrove

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Thanks Le petit caporal, I saw a news flash that said they were tried to be run over.
 
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