How to climb a rope ....

USMCRET

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Dusaboss, you have to realize the Athletes are walking recruiting posters for their services. Think about it, out of the Thousands and Thousands in the Military, a fraction of a percent make it big. They bring in the recruits, at least that's how it works in the Corps. Free publicity. Back in the mid 90s Riddick Bowe, the World Heavy Weight Champ decided he wanted to join the Corps. They had to write all kinds of waivers for him, he was a world champ and so on. He didn't last a month.

 

Joseph Cosgrove

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I think I've mentioned this before, about the recruiting of the legion's cross country team? As unusual as it may seem, in the time of general Piquemal, the legion would send out "spotters" to the various international athletic meetings, not only in France. They would then come back with various candidates, with the promise of competing in races and of course french nationality after their 5 years.
Did I ever consider these people real legionnaires?
:love:
Of course they were flying the legion colors. You can clearly see the logo of the legion on their tee shirts. They went through basic training, occasionally wearing boots, and I also remember that they did a corporals course (between themselves).
I'm not sure if they kept up that particular recruiting program when the general left? I hope not.
 
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I think I've mentioned this before, about the recruiting of the legion's cross country team? As unusual as it may seem, in the time of general Piquemal, the legion would send out "spotters" to the various international athletic meetings, not only in France. They would then come back with various candidates, with the promise of competing in races and of course french nationality after their 5 years.
Did I ever consider these people real legionnaires?
:love:
Of course they were flying the legion colors. You can clearly see the logo of the legion on their tee shirts. They went through basic training, occasionally wearing boots, and I also remember that they did a corporals course (between themselves).
I'm not sure if they kept up that particular recruiting program when the general left? I hope not.
Interesting , did they have to go through basic training , learn skill at arms etc with everyone else ?
 

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I think I've mentioned this before, about the recruiting of the legion's cross country team? As unusual as it may seem, in the time of general Piquemal, the legion would send out "spotters" to the various international athletic meetings, not only in France. They would then come back with various candidates, with the promise of competing in races and of course french nationality after their 5 years.
Did I ever consider these people real legionnaires?
:love:
Of course they were flying the legion colors. You can clearly see the logo of the legion on their tee shirts. They went through basic training, occasionally wearing boots, and I also remember that they did a corporals course (between themselves).
I'm not sure if they kept up that particular recruiting program when the general left? I hope not.
That's how it works, big publicity for La Legion and a positive face
 

USMCRET

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Interesting , did they have to go through basic training , learn skill at arms etc with everyone else ?
In the Marine Corps they had to actually become Marines, same boot camp, Marine Combat Training, and then their MOS training, after that if the made an All Marine Team they would get Temporary Additional Duty Orders to the activity. In Gary's case he was TDY to the All Marine Corps Boxing Team at Camp Lejeune. His daily routine was what you'd expect of a boxer, many miles of running and ring time, all day every day M thru F. Then International Events, Military Events, and Olympic Trials. That was back in the glory days of Amateur Boxing. They used to show it on the Wide World of Sports. The US Team may fight the say French, USSR, UK, or an International Team. The US team that day may include members of the US Military, all branches, and civilians. You had to make the cut for the event.

In my early Marine Corps days, a Sergeant, the Actual USSR Team came to Camp Lejeune and fought the All Marine Team. They whipped our asses in most matches, but this was the Marine Corps Team, not the US Team. It was a great event to attend.

 

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1570161703181.png1570163842029.png

This is a photo which I found of part the legion's cross country team. If you look carefully you will see the legion logo on the top right of their shirts.
I remember when I was in my last 6 months before retiring. We had a meeting with a couple of civilians who came to inform us of our right to dole and what not...
Anyway to make a long story short, we finished around 15:00 so I said f*ck this I'm not waiting around another 2 and a half hours. So I got changed and as I was going out the gate there was a bunch of the cross country team in front of me waiting to pass in front of the Sgt chef de poste. All dressed in civvies. I don't know if it's still obligatory, what with the threat of terrorism and all, but in my day, you had to have 5 years (and one day - that's another story) to go out in civilian clothes. As rank has it's privileges, I walked in front of the remaining 4. One of them shouted Hey!
I think he must have sh$t himself when I grabbed a hold of his collar.
The Sgt comes out and tells me to let go of him and asks for my leave pass, which you needed to leave the camp early. I said that I didn't have one and that we had finished early etc. and besides, this lot didn't have one and also they were dressed in civilian clothes.
'they're the équipe de crosse' he said lamely.
With less than 6 months to go after 17 years of service, I said 'so am I', and off I went.
I don't think the Sgt reported me, however it brought back memories of wondering around Aubagne when I was waiting to go overseas or having come back and waiting to go on leave. In those days, if you were't on service, you were bored out of your mind because you were not allowed in the company (CAPLE) during working hours, and of course you were not allowed out of camp until 17:30 and only then in uniform unless you had more than 5 years of service.
 

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