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Just created my very own you tube channel & facebook page.

mark wake

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First and foremost is the REP, there is no question about that. Secondly 3ème Reich, the others were OK but...
I think the hardest regiments to join 40-50 years ago was the REP..3REI..and 13DBLE.. simply from my experience and talking to other anciens..1ère REC..had a bad rap..but I suspect because we were jealous of their mode of transportation!😉
 

voltigeur

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I think the hardest regiments to join 40-50 years ago was the REP..3REI..and 13DBLE.. simply from my experience and talking to other anciens..1ère REC..had a bad rap..but I suspect because we were jealous of their mode of transportation!😉
True, however the transportation was to a base of operation and after that it was operations like the REP and other para regiments.
We were sort of an intervention regiment and could be sent quicker to reported infiltrations when airborne troops were not practical.
The 1er REC replaced the 3 em REI in the Aures Nementcha mountains were a lot of infiltrations came from the Tunisian border.
Both REP regiments operated further North of the Aures.
Many times we operated at the same time in the same area along with other French troops.
 

mark wake

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True, however the transportation was to a base of operation and after that it was operations like the REP and other para regiments.
We were sort of an intervention regiment and could be sent quicker to reported infiltrations when airborne troops were not practical.
The 1er REC replaced the 3 em REI in the Aures Nementcha mountains were a lot of infiltrations came from the Tunisian border.
Both REP regiments operated further North of the Aures.
Many times we operated at the same time in the same area along with other French troops.
You old cavalry dog!😉..much respect.
 

Joseph Cosgrove

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Last edited:

Joseph Cosgrove

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I'll be posting the video in English tomorrow. For the moment it's in french.

The sacred way of 1st RE, Aubagne, where do we get this name from? What has it got to do with the 1st world war. When did it get this name.
What was its nickname before.
Is it official that you can be punished for strolling across it.
How many regiments have a sacred way?
#
Le Monument aux Morts, who paid for it.
Who was the sculpture who sculptured the globe and its four legionnaires who mount the guard.
What do the 4 four legionnaires represent?
What happened to the list of the names of the 22 000 legionnaires killed from the creation of the legion to the erection of the monument?
Which year was the monument moved from Algeria to its new resting home on the Sacred way?
How long did it take to construct the Monument?
Which year was the the Inauguration of Monument for the first time?
Who was the brain child behind it?
#
Le mauvais esprit (bad spirit) is it punishable? Can you go to a legion jail for it?
#
How many years does a legionnaire's seniority stripe represent?
Did the legion invent the seniority stripe.
When did it begin & does it still exist?

If you don't know or no are longer sure then Legion traditions part 3 is for you.

1630045197276.png
 

Papillon

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I'll be posting the video in English tomorrow. For the moment it's in french.

The sacred way of 1st RE, Aubagne, where do we get this name from? What has it got to do with the 1st world war. When did it get this name.
What was its nickname before.
Is it official that you can be punished for strolling across it.
How many regiments have a sacred way?
#
Le Monument aux Morts, who paid for it.
Who was the sculpture who sculptured the globe and its four legionnaires who mount the guard.
What do the 4 four legionnaires represent?
What happened to the list of the names of the 22 000 legionnaires killed from the creation of the legion to the erection of the monument?
Which year was the monument moved from Algeria to its new resting home on the Sacred way?
How long did it take to construct the Monument?
Which year was the the Inauguration of Monument for the first time?
Who was the brain child behind it?
#
Le mauvais esprit (bad spirit) is it punishable? Can you go to a legion jail for it?
#
How many years does a legionnaire's seniority stripe represent?
Did the legion invent the seniority stripe.
When did it begin & does it still exist?

If you don't know or no are longer sure then Legion traditions part 3 is for you.

View attachment 7103
This will pass a few good hours some evening thanks Joe.
 

Joseph Cosgrove

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This will pass a few good hours some evening thanks Joe.
Thanks Papillon, mate. It's a petty that there isn't a bit more enthusiasm from those who are going to join. I mean to be quite honest it is them who will be benefitting from it the most.
There are a couple of things that I learned while researching for the contents, even though I did spend my last 11 months working in the museum.
The next video will be centered around the pioneers.
 

Joseph Cosgrove

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I've just put the English version :
The French foreign Legion & her traditions # part 3 (in English)


Traditions part 3.jpg


The sacred way of 1st RE, Aubagne, where do we get this name from?
What has it got to do with the 1st world war.
When did it get this name.
What was its nickname before.
Is it official that you can be punished for strolling across it.
How many regiments have a sacred way?
#
Le Monument aux Morts, who paid for it.
Who was the sculpture who sculptured the globe and its four legionnaires who mount the guard.
What do the 4 four legionnaires represent?
What happened to the list of the names of the 22 000 legionnaires killed from the creation of the legion to the erection of the monument?
Which year was the monument moved from Algeria to its new resting home on the Sacred way?
How long did it take to construct the Monument?
Which year was the the Inauguration of Monument for the first time?
Who was the brain child behind it?
#
Le mauvais esprit (bad spirit) is it punishable? Can you go to a legion jail for it?
#
How many years does a legionnaire's seniority stripe represent?
Did the legion invent the seniority stripe.
When did it begin & does it still exist?

If you don't know or no are longer sure then Legion traditions part 3 is for you.
 

Joseph Cosgrove

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Here it is in English, the Write Up at least :
1630818758255.png My old stamping ground

Who are these bearded legionnaires with their shouldered axes who march at the head of the legion?
Why do they have this honor?
Is it compulsory to have a beard to be pioneer, and if so why?
The mountain was blocking our way.
The order was given to pass anyway...
The legion executed it.

True but where was the mountain and what era, how long would it take the pioneers to dig a tunnel through a mountain?
The pioneers were originally grenadiers, who were considered elite soldiers because they would be at the head of their troops in order to lobe grenades at the enemy. In order to distinguish them from other soldiers they would wear an insignia on the their uniforms of a grenade.

Did you know that it was Rosenberg (who was himself a legionnaire) who designed the exploding grenade of 7 flames. If any legionnaire is asking himself who Rosenberg is, you only have to take a look at you company's club walls. But was his design made compulsory? No, just take a look at the insignia of the DLEM.

Next up (in part 5) will be the 'Musique de la Légion Étrangère' and the Origins (?) of The Boudin.
Although I have to warn you in advance, no-one knows for sure. + a little more about the uniform, for example where and why we got all those creases in our 'tenue de sortie' shirts.


I know that most of you don't give a f@ck about the traditions, or perhaps telling yourself that you will learn it all once you are in
If I was on the recruiting board, and someone says to me how much they have always wanted to join the legion.:unsure: "That is all I've ever dreamed about since I was ten years old" Even though that person is now 30, I would take then on their their word and immediately continue the interview in French, and then ask them what they know about the different regiments. Or in most cases (before they get through Castel);) about the REP. Then I would start on the better known of the traditions... Au suivant !

However, for all those of you are current or ex US serving members, I uploaded this this morning:
US CJTF taking part in French desert Commando course Preparation, Djibouti.
1630820657803.png

US military in training before they tackle the French desert commando course in Djibouti, Horn of Africa.
Planning and Preparation Prevents... we all know the old saying.
In addition to the heat, there is nothing to take cover behind.

For all the anciens legionnaires, Africa is practically a second home. However for the neophytes to the harsh, dry, and hot environment it can be a rude awakening. Which is the whole point of this 'dry run '; not to test their endurance or their capacity in adapting to a hostile, arid and parched area, but as part of their training.

Who can say where tomorrow, these soldiers under the stars and stripes flag of the US military will be sent.
At least if it is to another African or any other country where the rate of evaporation is greater than precipitation, they will be ready and prepared for combat.

Des militaires américains en formation avant de d'entamer le cours de Commando Désert Français à Djibouti (dans la Corne de l'Afrique).

"La planification et la préparation préviennent"... comme le dit si bien le vieil adage anglais.
En plus de la chaleur, il n'y a rien pour s'abriter des tirs.
Pour tous les anciens légionnaires, l'Afrique est pratiquement une seconde maison.

Mais pour les néophytes de l'environnement dur, sec et chaud, le réveil peut -être brutal.
C'est là tout l'intérêt de ce "dry run", non pas pour tester leur endurance ou leur capacité d'adaptation dans une zone hostile, aride et dèsséchée, mais dans le cadre de leur entraînement.

Qui peut dire où demain, ces soldats portant le drapeau aux étoiles et les rayures de l'armée américaine seront envoyés? Au moins, si c'est en Afrique ou dans tout autre pays où le taux d'évaporation est supérieur aux précipitations, ils seront formés et prêts au combat.

 

Joseph Cosgrove

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I'll be putting out a test (hopefully) on Wednesday, based on the 4 parts in the series, hopefully that might motivate a few of the 'hangers on' to take an interest in the legion traditions.

What I call hanger ons are those who only want the legion for what they can get out of it. five years and a Willy Wonker golden ticket to living in France so that they can bing their family over. Which in itself, I can understand. However if it is your intention to one year in a company combat, get an OPEX and then become a waiter in the officer's mess...

I'll put out the answers to the French version on Friday with my next installment and Saturday with the English version.
Why not the other way around? Because it is a lot easier to translate from good French to English than visa versa.
 

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As always to be watched on Youtube, thanks


Description in English, čeština & Français,
NATO is supporting the development of new technology designed to minimize casualties during combat operations. It involves soldiers wearing various body sensors that will help medics collect vital data and determine the extent to which a soldier may be injured more accurately than a field medic would be able to conclude.

The new technology is called the Digital Triage Assistant (DTA) system.

The original concept came from a collaboration between students of Johns Hopkins University and the NATO Allied Command Transformation Innovation Hub. It has since expanded and now involves researchers from the Czech Technical University in Prague, the DefSec Innovation Hub, the Czech University of Defence and the General Staff of the Czech Armed Forces. Footage includes scenes of a simulated attack showing soldiers wearing prototype devices. It also includes soundbites with Kristina Soukupová, President, DefSec Innovation Hub and Major Bedrich Hyza, Chief of Training, Military Academy, Brno.

NATO podporuje vývoj nových technologií navržených tak, aby minimalizovaly ztráty během bojových operací. Zahrnuje vojáky, kteří nosí různá tělesná čidla, která pomohou lékařům sbírat životně důležité údaje a určit, do jaké míry může být voják zraněn přesněji, než by byl schopen uzavřít polní lékař. Nová technologie se nazývá systém Digital Triage Assistant (DTA). Původní koncept pocházel ze spolupráce studentů Univerzity Johna Hopkinse a Centra pro inovace Allied Command Transformation Innovation Hub. Od té doby se rozšířil a nyní zahrnuje výzkumné pracovníky z ČVUT v Praze, Inovačního centra DefSec, České univerzity obrany a Generálního štábu AČR. Záběry obsahují scény ze simulovaného útoku ukazující vojáky na prototypových zařízeních. Obsahuje také soundbites s Kristinou Soukupovou, prezidentkou, DefSec Innovation Hub a majorem Bedrichem Hyzou, náčelníkem výcviku, Vojenské akademie, Brno.

L'OTAN soutient le développement de nouvelles technologies conçues pour minimiser les pertes au cours des opérations de combat. Il implique des soldats qui portent divers capteurs corporels pour aider les médecins à collecter des données vitales et à déterminer dans quelle mesure un soldat peut être blessé avec plus de précision qu'un médecin de terrain ne pourrait le conclure.

La nouvelle technologie s'appelle Digital Triage Assistant (DTA). Le concept original est né d'une collaboration entre des étudiants de l'Université Johns Hopkins et du Allied Command Transformation Innovation Hub. Depuis lors, il s'est agrandi et comprend désormais des chercheurs de l'Université technique tchèque de Prague, du Centre d'innovation DefSec, de l'Université tchèque de la Défense et de l'état-major de l'ACR. Les images contiennent des scènes d'une attaque simulée montrant des soldats sur des prototypes d'appareils. Il contient également des extraits sonores avec Kristina Soukupová, présidente, DefSec Innovation Hub et le major Bedrich Hyza, chef de la formation, Académie militaire, Brno.
 

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As always to be watched (and liked) on Youtube

Description in English, Eestlane & Français.
Subtitles in French & English

US paratroopers kicked off the US-led exercise Swift Response 2021 with a night-time parachute jump into Estonia in the early hours of 8 May. The drop involved hundreds of troops assigned to the US Army 3rd Brigade Combat Team, 82nd Airborne.
The training was part of the US-led exercise Swift Response, which includes paratroopers from 10 other NATO countries, conducting jumps into Bulgaria and Romania as well.
In Estonia, other elements of the exercise included a helicopter assault and a live-fire Multiple Launch Rocket System (MLRS) demonstration by the 77th Field Artillery Regiment.
All paratroopers were vaccinated against COVID-19 before arrival. Footage includes various shots of the helicopter assault exercise, the night-time parachute drop and the MLRS demonstration.

 

Joseph Cosgrove

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1631236537293.png
Hi all, in the end I changed the thumb nail because you can't really see the snipers rifle.

With thanks and much appreciation to the NATO Multi Media TV crew.
Description in English, Deutsch & Français
What does it take to be the best sniper in Europe? Find out alongside shooters from 14 NATO Allies and partners as they strive for gold in the European Best Sniper Team Competition.
I can only assume that the French foreign Legion was not invited or was unavailable or considered 'hors competition"
Helico.jpg
Synopsis
Every year, the US Army’s 7th Army Training Command hosts the European Best Sniper Team Competition in Bavaria, Germany.
The competition tests participants’ physical endurance, marksmanship and mental toughness over a series of events based on real-life scenarios. In one event, for example, competitors must navigate a trench filled with tear gas while engaging targets both near and far.
In another event, participants must rush to a downed helicopter, retrieve a 100-kilogram dummy and drag it to safety. Teams from 14 NATO Allies and partners participated in the 2021 competition.

Slovenia claimed first place, followed by Turkey in second and Latvia in third.

Footage includes shots of snipers from the Italian Army, the Slovenian Special Forces, the Swedish Army Ranger Battalion and the Turkish Army during the competition, and interviews with an Italian sniper and a US Army competition leader. COVID-19 safeguards were taken prior to deployment for the competition and participants observed social distancing where training requirements allowed.
 

Joseph Cosgrove

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It's all go today lads,
a quiz ! (to be watched on you, please).


The description like the test will be in English & Français.
All the answers to the questions are in parts 1, 2, 3 and 4 of the playlist 'legion traditions'.
There are no trick question, you either know the answer or you know where to find it. In fact the only question that you may have any difficulty with is the one about when the Képi blancs first paraded down the Champs Élysée.
It is completely by hazard that the thumb nail is the question. What I did not want to do is the usual: who created the legion and when? At least I didn't want to make it that easy.
I will put put out the answers with next video, traditions # 5 (hopefully Monday). It's mostly about the Musique (bless 'em) although you would be pleasantly surprised what you can find once you dig into their past.
 

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1631598343921.png
Martin would have loved the theme.


The existence of the Foreign Legion Band (MLE) dates back to its creation in 1831.
It was renamed at the creation of the two Foreign Regiments in 1941. Thereafter, the number of regimental bands and fanfares multiplied. The Music of the 1st Foreign Regiment, stationed at the common depot in Sidi-Bel-Abbès, thus became the Main Band of the Foreign Legion (MPLE).
The different bands of the Foreign Legion were dissolved in 1914 and 1939. Their musicians were then distributed to the combat units for the duration of the war. These bands were reconstituted in 1919 and 1946.
The recruitment profile of the musicians and the difficulties encountered in reconstituting its personnel were often at the origin of most of the "arrangements" made over the years to its musical repertoire. It was indeed a question of adapting the scores to the number and the quality of the instrumentalists of which the musical formation had access. In 1972, a real "conservatory" was created within the MPLE, in order to allow it to train its own musicians, which still exists today. In 1999, as part of the reorganization of the army, all the regimental bands were dissolved.
The MPLE remained the only musical formation of the Foreign Legion. It thus became again The Foreign Legion Band : " Musique de la Légion Étrangère."

# I have also included the origins of 'The Boudin'. Why there was sausages (the bed rolls) for the Swiss, Alsatians and those from Lorrain.

# I have also included the origins of the REP's insignia i.e. what it represents.

What I didn't have time to do was the shirts and its creases. (nest time)
Here is the link to REP Fever
And lastly but by no means least the link for the answers to the quiz.
It does mean taking it again. Let me reassure everyone, I will not see your email, or know in anyway who takes the test: https://forms.gle/npXXrkMXLeTxbSGZ9

And in case that doesn't work:

 
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