New member introduction , questions

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Hi Kev, you joined the forum on the 1st of March. It's Sunday 3rd, what progress have you made? Have you joined a club? Have you checked out which cross country races or road races are on in your area.
Talk won't get you in the legion, it's action that will get you there.
Going to a local martial arts gym tomorrow night and going to start running today aswell , got a few hills nearby aswell so I can start walking up them with a backpack on and started training on my pull ups last night.
 

Papillon

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Hi Papi,
As far as I know they are still based in the Spanish enclaves in Morocco. I had a few beer with some of them in Melilla in the mid 80s and got along with them very well. I was actually seriously joining the Spanish legion when I left the French legion in 1962 as well. I had no further interest in the French legion then because the war in Algeria ended at the same time, and I knew that a peacetime legion would just be wall-to-wall corvees. But eventuall I justwent back to sea. I have copied some further information.

«The Spanish Legion evacuated the Moroccan Protectorate in February 1961, and the Spanish Sahara in February 1976. The Legion’s most active service of late has been in the unusual role of United Nations peacekeeper in Central America, the former Yugoslavia, and Africa. Today, its most exotic recent member is a Sikh from India and its main foreign source of enlistees is Africa. The 7,000-strong Spanish Foreign Legion garrisons two fortress enclaves on the Moroccan coast, Melilla and Ceuta. Held by Spain for more than 500 years, they are duly considered Spanish soil. Should Spain ever give them up, then perhaps the Legion that shouted and sang about death will itself finally die.»

I love watching them marching and singing ‘El novio de la Muerte’ though, their regimental song.

Thanks Jonny, the guy that joined from the Spanish Legion was a good guy, many thanks for the further information.
 

Joseph Cosgrove

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I was with a Brit as renfort PM who did his thee years in the Spanish legion. He didn't say much about but did say the French was way better. He did learn to speak Spanish from it.
They no longer take foreigners but do still exist. They sent a delegation to Aubagne to visit the museum.
I believe it was Franco who started them, he was their commanding officer in the '30s (to be verified).
 

Le petit caporal

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Bénitez was in the Spanish Legion (think he deserted to join the French foriegn légion)
They have a Bat.based on the Îles Canaries @ Feurteventura

Walking is the best and the most useful activity man invented
'Just do it', but in silence
Don't talk , just walk. .any where (you do not need a destination, that's a tourist agency and bent taxi driver thing to do)
Consumes time and energy and is probally insignificant shyte spouted
Avoid big Gubbers like the pest (they are obvisouly on the make)
Travel light (souvenirs are kept in your head)
Run if you have to. It's the survival instinct (to flee from danger or capture Haggis)
5, 10 and maybe a 15 km run, once in a while, at a regular pace is all you need. ..any thing over, is a total waste of time and precious ressources and has no positive impact on your general health
 
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jonny

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I was with a Brit as renfort PM who did his thee years in the Spanish legion. He didn't say much about but did say the French was way better. He did learn to speak Spanish from it.
They no longer take foreigners but do still exist. They sent a delegation to Aubagne to visit the museum.
I believe it was Franco who started them, he was their commanding officer in the '30s (to be verified).
Not quite right, Franco was associated with the Spanish legion since the beginning, but he was not the first commander. Although he was made second in command by its first commander, Milan Astray, who was so often wounded that it was joked that he had more bits shot off him than what remainded, including a bullet through his right eye.
I copy some facts:

Re; Spanish Legion
“A Motley Band of Desperados, Misfits and Outcasts”

Officially the Regiment of Foreigners (Tercio de Extranjeros), it was commonly—and preferably by its leaders and men—known as the Foreign Legion (Legion Extranjeros). No matter what the name implied, however, Spain’s “foreign” force would be 90 percent Spanish 90 percent of the time. The first commander, inevitably, was Millan Astray. For his deputy he made a fateful choice, starting an obscure ambitious officer on the road to eventual command of the Legion and of Spain itself: Captain Francisco Franco.

«The Legion that fought in Morocco was described by Franco’s main English language biographer, Paul Preston, as “a motley band of desperados, misfits, and outcasts, some tough and ruthless, others simply pathetic.” They were primarily disgruntled, disoriented World War I veterans from both sides, hired killers from Barcelona, fugitives from the law, adventurers, and the hungry off the streets. Among the Beau Geste types were a Russian prince, a Polish count, a circus clown, and a former friar seeking penance. In the mixed bag could be found Italian, German, Austrian, South American, Portuguese, Maltese, French, Swiss, and British (who actually expected tea breaks!). There was Prussian Carl Tieden Zaden, who became the Legion’s most outstanding and decorated non-Spanish officer (He would be posthumously appointed the Legion commander after dying of wounds in the Civil War to come). There was the first of only two Americans known to have served in the Legion, a black man named William Brown.»

Sounds a bit like the French Foreign Legion to me, :)

(And another little known fact is that one of these men was a small Scottish corporal who would always ridle sidesaddle on his horse wearing a tartan kilt.)

A pic of the old Spanish Legionnaires.
4616
 
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Not quite right, Franco was associated with the Spanish legion since the beginning, but he was not the first commander. Although he was made second in command by its first commander, Milan Astray, who was so often wounded that it was joked that he had more bits shot off him than remainded. I copy some facts:

Re; Spanish Legion
“A Motley Band of Desperados, Misfits and Outcasts”

Officially the Regiment of Foreigners (Tercio de Extranjeros), it was commonly—and preferably by its leaders and men—known as the Foreign Legion (Legion Extranjeros). No matter what the name implied, however, Spain’s “foreign” force would be 90 percent Spanish 90 percent of the time. The first commander, inevitably, was Millan Astray. For his deputy he made a fateful choice, starting an obscure ambitious officer on the road to eventual command of the Legion and of Spain itself: Captain Francisco Franco.

«The Legion that fought in Morocco was described by Franco’s main English language biographer, Paul Preston, as “a motley band of desperados, misfits, and outcasts, some tough and ruthless, others simply pathetic.” They were primarily disgruntled, disoriented World War I veterans from both sides, hired killers from Barcelona, fugitives from the law, adventurers, and the hungry off the streets. Among the Beau Geste types were a Russian prince, a Polish count, a circus clown, and a former friar seeking penance. In the mixed bag could be found Italian, German, Austrian, South American, Portuguese, Maltese, French, Swiss, and British (who actually expected tea breaks!). There was Prussian Carl Tieden Zaden, who became the Legion’s most outstanding and decorated non-Spanish officer (He would be posthumously appointed the Legion commander after dying of wounds in the Civil War to come). There was the first of only two Americans known to have served in the Legion, a black man named William Brown.»

Sounds a bit like the French Foreign Legion to me, :)

(And another little known fact is that one of these men was a small Scottish corporal who would always ridle sidesaddle on his horse wearing a tartan kilt.)

View attachment 4616
Well if they had a jock in there... OK in my books 😁
 

Le petit caporal

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If it's a little caporal from Scotland, gets my approuval too
We're a rare breed, like truffles
 

Le petit caporal

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Did a paying course on one
Had a dog (Tanya) dressed for truffles
It's my hobby, mushrooms, asperges sauvage, straw berries sauvage, chest nuts etc. ..
Can tell you some techniques
Where you see a certain fly. ..there is truffles
When you find a truffle. ..there is more. ..they grow in a faisseau. ..straight line
Above the truffle, nothing grows (bit like thym) they do not support the concurrence and due to expansive roots (to capture water)
Pigs or a tame Boar but grab the truffle before it scoffs it
Why do we call the snout or nose, 'the truffe / truffle'...i'll let you guess
Flair, it's all about flairing
Fly, dog, pig. ..i can spot a pontienal faisseau just by looking at the soil and certain trees (noisetier / chêne vert etc) and of course the smell. ..just after the rain. ..hmmm c'est par ici !
Cèpes, chantrelles / Girolles, Pleurettes, pied de moutons. ..look first for a tree stump
Was the Romain Legionnaires who introduced chest nuts to Britain
A méditerranéen tree, nicked named, 'the pain de pauvre'
See Corsica and the Ardèche
The wood of Chessnut has an anti parasite essence and was often used to make window frames, corniches, rosaces etc
 

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