On this day

OP
Joseph Cosgrove

Joseph Cosgrove

Moderator
Legionnaire
Joined
Jul 13, 2013
Messages
5,667
Reaction score
4,090
Location
Hua Hin Thailand
Best answers
1
Home Country
New Zealand
Nice one Pink Floyd, Let's not forget also the French, the Aussis and Kiwis (both always ready to give the UK a hand in a scrap), the Rhodesians the Sourh Africans, the Senegalese, the Poles... and my old man.
My Dad who was Southern Irish (as Neutral as the Swiss) joined the British Navy for the "duration of the war". I don't think that he took part in the D Day landings - no night Jumper my old man ! However he was wounded twice in the same arm, he had the scars to prove it.

A couple of years early but it looks to be a good movie. Coming out on the 12th of this month:
 
OP
Joseph Cosgrove

Joseph Cosgrove

Moderator
Legionnaire
Joined
Jul 13, 2013
Messages
5,667
Reaction score
4,090
Location
Hua Hin Thailand
Best answers
1
Home Country
New Zealand
It looks as though it was all happening on this day the 7th of June;
The Sun King was crowned on this day in 1654:
(It's only 3Mins 12 secs long.)
 
OP
Joseph Cosgrove

Joseph Cosgrove

Moderator
Legionnaire
Joined
Jul 13, 2013
Messages
5,667
Reaction score
4,090
Location
Hua Hin Thailand
Best answers
1
Home Country
New Zealand
The great plague of london

In 1665 and 1666, the last great outbreak of bubonic plague to hit England swept through the capital, London. The outbreak was much smaller in scale than the Black Death of the 14th century, but was still notable for having killed as many as 100,000 people - about a quarter of the city's population - in eighteen months.

By July 1665 the plague was spreading rapidly in London. Many fled, including the King Charles II, if they were wealthy enough to afford it. Parliament was moved to Oxford University from Westminster Palace. Many of the city's businesses closed. Diarist Samuel Pepys wrote much about life in the city during the plague, and of empty streets.

By September, as many as 7,000 people a week were dying, and many were thrown into mass graves. The true toll was likely to be much higher, since the deaths of poor were not recorded.

The University of Cambridge closed down during the outbreak, forcing a young Isaac Newton to continue his studies from home - during this time he expanded significantly on his new idea about the laws of gravity, among other things.

By November the outbreak started to taper off, and the King returned in February the next year when it was considered to be safe enough. Disaster would strike London again in 1666, with much of it being destroyed in the Great Fire of London that September.

1591498019062.png
Drivers of death carts in London would go street-to-street extolling people to "bring out your dead" at the height of the London plague outbreak in 1665.

"That every house visited [by the disease] be marked with a red cross of a foot long in the middle of the door, evident to be seen, and with these usual printed words, that is to say, "Lord, have mercy upon us," to be set close over the same cross, there to continue until lawful opening of the same house."

During the Great Plague of London (1665-1666), the disease called the bubonic plague killed about 200,000 people in London, England. ... The Great Fire of London*, which happened on 2-6 September 1666, may have helped end the outbreak by killing many of the rats and fleas who were spreading the plague.

*The fire started at 1am on Sunday morning on 2 September in Thomas Farriner's bakery on Pudding Lane. It may have been caused by a spark from his oven falling onto a pile of fuel nearby. The fire spread easily because London was very dry after a long, hot summer.
 
OP
Joseph Cosgrove

Joseph Cosgrove

Moderator
Legionnaire
Joined
Jul 13, 2013
Messages
5,667
Reaction score
4,090
Location
Hua Hin Thailand
Best answers
1
Home Country
New Zealand
Also on this day in 1776
1776-06-07 Richard Lee (Virginia) moves Declaration of Independence in Continental Congress ;

1591499303407.png

At the top in the middle, you can see the Name John Hancock. He wanted to rub the Brit's noses in it by letting them know that he was involved in the breakaway.
Hancock was one of Boston's leaders during the crisis that led to the outbreak of the American Revolutionary War in 1775. He served more than two years in the Continental Congress in Philadelphia, and he was the first to sign the Declaration of Independence in his position as president of Congress.

It is not unusual for someone to say "put your John Hancock here", when signing a form:
 
OP
Joseph Cosgrove

Joseph Cosgrove

Moderator
Legionnaire
Joined
Jul 13, 2013
Messages
5,667
Reaction score
4,090
Location
Hua Hin Thailand
Best answers
1
Home Country
New Zealand
1924 George Leigh-Mallory disappears 775' (236 meters) from Everest's summit (2nd attempt.

If you want to read a very good book on the subject :
1591500921134.png
"Some people have dreams that are so magnificent that if they were to achieve them, their place in history would be guaranteed. People like Christopher Columbus, Isaac Newton, Florence Nightingale, Thomas Edison, Nancy Astor, Charles Lindbergh, Amy Johnson, Edmund Hilary and Neil Armstrong—their unparalleled success has made their stories into legend.
But what if one man had such a dream, and once he’d achieved it, there was no proof that he had fulfilled his ambition?
Jeffrey Archer’s new novel, Paths of Glory, is the story of such a man—George Mallory. Born in 1886, he was a brilliant student who became part of the Bloomsbury Group at Cambridge in the early twentieth century and served in the Royal Garrison Artillery during World War I. After the war, he married, had three children, and would have spent the rest of his life as a schoolteacher, but for his love of mountain climbing.
Mallory once told a reporter that he wanted to climb Mt. Everest, “because it is there.” On his third try in 1924, at age thirty-seven, he was last seen four hundred feet from the top. His body was found in 1999, and it remains a mystery whether he and his climbing partner, Andrew Irvine, ever reached the summit.
In fact, not until you’ve turned the last page of Archer’s extraordinary novel will you be able to decide if George Mallory should be added to that list of legends, while another name would have to be removed. Paths of Glory is truly a triumph."
 
OP
Joseph Cosgrove

Joseph Cosgrove

Moderator
Legionnaire
Joined
Jul 13, 2013
Messages
5,667
Reaction score
4,090
Location
Hua Hin Thailand
Best answers
1
Home Country
New Zealand
2002 French Open Women's Tennis: Serena Williams wins her first French title; beats older sister Venus Williams 7-5, 6-3


I'll tell you what, I would't like to get a back hand slap off Serena for being cheeky.
 
OP
Joseph Cosgrove

Joseph Cosgrove

Moderator
Legionnaire
Joined
Jul 13, 2013
Messages
5,667
Reaction score
4,090
Location
Hua Hin Thailand
Best answers
1
Home Country
New Zealand
Spain Declares War Against the United States

1898
1st US Marines (600) land at Guantanamo, Cuba during the Spanish-American War
April 24, 1898 — Explorer Christopher Columbus landed on Cuba's northeastern coast in 1492 and claimed the island for the new Kingdom of Spain, which had sponsored his journey of discovery. For the Cuban people, there followed 400 years of slavery, degradation and rebellion.
Here’s what Columbus wrote about them in his diary: “They brought us parrots and balls of cotton and spears and many other things, which they exchanged for glass beads and hawks’ bells.

“They willingly traded everything they owned. They do not bear arms, and do not know them, for I showed them a sword, they took it by the edge and cut themselves out of ignorance. They have no iron.

“They would make fine servants. With fifty men we could subjugate them all and make them do whatever we want.”

This became the policy of the Spanish who took over Cuba following Columbus’s discovery. Resentment simmered among the islanders but it was not until 1868 that a major rebellion erupted resulting in what became known as the Ten Years’ War, with 200,000 Spanish casualties.

In 1892 the Cuban Revolutionary Party was formed with the aim of achieving independence from Spain. The Spanish reacted with suppression, creating “reconcentrados” – fortified towns that are seen as forerunners of the Second World War concentration camps. Up to 400,000 Cubans died from starvation and disease in the “reconcentrados”.

As rioting took hold in Havana, the United States sent in a battleship – the USS Maine – “to protect American interests”. But within days of anchoring in Havana harbour the Maine was ripped apart by an explosion, killing three quarters of the crew – about 250 men.

The cause of the explosion was never established but some American newspapers – particularly William Randolph Hearst’s New York Journal – had no doubt: it must have been a Spanish mine.

As hysterical headlines poured off the presses, public opinion veered towards war amid chants of “Remember the Maine! To Hell with Spain!” Congress demanded independence for Cuba and authorised the use of force to achieve such an end.
1591848999415.png
Colonel ‘Teddy’ Roosevelt (centre, with glasses and holstered gun) with hisRough Riders’ after victory at the Battle of San Juan Hill.

Spain at first severed diplomatic relations but then on April 24, 1898 declared war against the United States. The next day Congress in turn declared war on Spain.

The war lasted for ten weeks, America’s far superior forces inevitably gaining victory over the Spanish.

Probably the most famous encounter came on July 1 when Colonel Theodore Roosevelt – who was to become US President in 1901 – led the 1st United States Volunteer Cavalry, known as the “Rough Riders,” in the Battle of San Juan Hill. He did so carrying a pistol recovered from the Maine.

Task & Purpose, a military and veteran-focused website, reports: “[It was] a bloody struggle to gain the high ground above enemy naval concentrations in the harbor of nearby Santiago de Cuba.

“The action cost [the US] over 1,000 soldiers – nearly five times as many as the Spanish – but despite the grave loss of life, Roosevelt overtook the enemy position and carried the day.”

Two days later the Spanish fleet was destroyed at the Battle of Santiago de Cuba, leading to surrender of the city.

After the war Spain and the United States signed the Treaty of Paris under which Spain ceded Puerto Rico, the Philippines, and Guam to the US for $20 million and Cuba became a protectorate of the United States.

It gained independence from the US in 1902 and would not hit international headlines again until President John F. Kennedy faced down Soviet leader Nikita Khrushchev in the Cuban Missile Crisis of 1962.
 
OP
Joseph Cosgrove

Joseph Cosgrove

Moderator
Legionnaire
Joined
Jul 13, 2013
Messages
5,667
Reaction score
4,090
Location
Hua Hin Thailand
Best answers
1
Home Country
New Zealand
1789 Captain William Bligh and his loyal men cast off from HMS Bounty reach Timor, after sailing 5,800 km in a 6-metre launch.
1592106972910.png

One of the most famous and remarkable stories in maritime history began on April 28, 1789, when rebellious mutineer Fletcher Christian and his supporters seized control of the HMS Bounty from its Lieutenant, William Bligh. Tensions between the two men had increased over the period of the Bounty's mission, which was to transport breadfruit plants from Tahiti to the West Indies. Bligh was considered an exceptionally harsh taskmaster with a penchant for cruel punishments by many of his men.

When the men arrived in Tahiti, there was a five-month layover, after which they became less willing to accept Bligh's discipline onboard the ship. Christian was a particular target for Bligh, who became increasingly angry and mutinous as the journey continued. Three weeks after the Tahiti layover, Christian acted, and he forced Bligh and most of his loyalists off the ship on April 28, 1789.

Bligh an 18 other men landed on the island of Tofua. He then proceeded west on a 6,500 km (4,000 mi) journey to Kupang to await a ship to Europe. He would arrive back in England in April 1790. The mutineers themselves had split; some had decided to stay in Tahiti, while Christian and others settled on Pitcairn Island. The British Admiralty dispatched the HMS Pandora to bring the mutineers to justice; fourteen were captured in Tahiti, Christian and his group were not discovered until an American ship found them in 1808, by which time John Adams* was the only surviving member of the mutineers.

Ten detainees made it back to England after the Pandora ran aground, with the loss of 31 crew members. Four were acquitted, three pardoned and three were hanged. Descendants of the mutineers live on Pitcairn Island to this day.

* Profession: 2nd US President (click on the link) , I didn't know that.

 

Perun

Super Active Member
Joined
Jan 24, 2013
Messages
1,168
Reaction score
301
Location
Zagreb
Best answers
0
Home Country
Croatia
1789 Captain William Bligh and his loyal men cast off from HMS Bounty reach Timor, after sailing 5,800 km in a 6-metre launch.
View attachment 6280

One of the most famous and remarkable stories in maritime history began on April 28, 1789, when rebellious mutineer Fletcher Christian and his supporters seized control of the HMS Bounty from its Lieutenant, William Bligh. Tensions between the two men had increased over the period of the Bounty's mission, which was to transport breadfruit plants from Tahiti to the West Indies. Bligh was considered an exceptionally harsh taskmaster with a penchant for cruel punishments by many of his men.

When the men arrived in Tahiti, there was a five-month layover, after which they became less willing to accept Bligh's discipline onboard the ship. Christian was a particular target for Bligh, who became increasingly angry and mutinous as the journey continued. Three weeks after the Tahiti layover, Christian acted, and he forced Bligh and most of his loyalists off the ship on April 28, 1789.

Bligh an 18 other men landed on the island of Tofua. He then proceeded west on a 6,500 km (4,000 mi) journey to Kupang to await a ship to Europe. He would arrive back in England in April 1790. The mutineers themselves had split; some had decided to stay in Tahiti, while Christian and others settled on Pitcairn Island. The British Admiralty dispatched the HMS Pandora to bring the mutineers to justice; fourteen were captured in Tahiti, Christian and his group were not discovered until an American ship found them in 1808, by which time John Adams* was the only surviving member of the mutineers.

Ten detainees made it back to England after the Pandora ran aground, with the loss of 31 crew members. Four were acquitted, three pardoned and three were hanged. Descendants of the mutineers live on Pitcairn Island to this day.

* Profession: 2nd US President (click on the link) , I didn't know that.

:)

On a side note, I found this guy's adventure to Pitcairn pretty entertaining;
 
OP
Joseph Cosgrove

Joseph Cosgrove

Moderator
Legionnaire
Joined
Jul 13, 2013
Messages
5,667
Reaction score
4,090
Location
Hua Hin Thailand
Best answers
1
Home Country
New Zealand
:)

On a side note, I found this guy's adventure to Pitcairn pretty entertaining;
He actually has a very interesting website, which I'm subscribed to, where he walks around London telling interesting historical stories about the various sites.
 
Joined
Jan 14, 2006
Messages
3,688
Reaction score
1,469
Location
U.K.
Best answers
0
Home Country
United Kingdom
June 15,1982.

38 years ago a ceasefire took place in the Falklands War as 7000 Argentine troops fled their positions outside Port Stanley, leaving the 8000-strong force under Maj. Gen. Jeremy Moore, Royal Marines, to break through the defence line and march into the capital.

Some 649 Argentine personnel, 255 British troops and three Falkland Islanders died during the conflict.

In 1959, I was a serving subaltern for 14 months in the same officers mess with two key players. Brigadier Julian Thompson, of 3 Commando Brigade, (nominated Man of the Match) and Colonel Tom Seccombe his original 2i/c of the task force.

I really am that old !😃
 
OP
Joseph Cosgrove

Joseph Cosgrove

Moderator
Legionnaire
Joined
Jul 13, 2013
Messages
5,667
Reaction score
4,090
Location
Hua Hin Thailand
Best answers
1
Home Country
New Zealand
Some of you may say who cares about English history and who was King John anyway?
Well Hollywood certainly cared about him as they've made enough movies on his subject.
The bad guy in Robin hood. :rolleyes: I wasn't going to mention the Magna Carta until I saw the latest Joolz guide to London, so I thought, Joe why not? That way the next time someone takes their children to see the cartoon version of Robin Hood, they can give them a history lesson on who King John was
1215 (easy enough to remember the 15th of June(06th month*2)
King John puts his seal on Magna Carta

Following a revolt by the English nobility against his rule, King John puts his royal seal on Magna Carta, or “the Great Charter.” The document, essentially a peace treaty between John and his barons, guaranteed that the king would respect feudal rights and privileges, uphold the freedom of the church, and maintain the nation’s laws. Although more a reactionary than a progressive document in its day, Magna Carta was seen as a cornerstone in the development of democratic England by later generations.

John was enthroned as king of England following the death of his brother, King Richard the Lion-Hearted, in 1199. King John’s reign was characterized by failure. He lost the duchy of Normandy to the French king and taxed the English nobility heavily to pay for his foreign misadventures. He quarreled with Pope Innocent III and sold church offices to build up the depleted royal coffers. Following the defeat of a campaign to regain Normandy in 1214, Stephen Langton, the archbishop of Canterbury, called on the disgruntled barons to demand a charter of liberties from the king.
In 1215, the barons rose up in rebellion against the king’s abuse of feudal law and custom. John, faced with a superior force, had no choice but to give in to their demands. Earlier kings of England had granted concessions to their feudal barons, but these charters were vaguely worded and issued voluntarily. The document drawn up for John in June 1215, however, forced the king to make specific guarantees of the rights and privileges of his barons and the freedom of the church. On June 15, 1215, John met the barons at Runnymede on the Thames and set his seal to the Articles of the Barons, which after minor revision was formally issued as Magna Carta.

The charter consisted of a preamble and 63 clauses and dealt mainly with feudal concerns that had little impact outside 13th century England. However, the document was remarkable in that it implied there were laws the king was bound to observe, thus precluding any future claim to absolutism by the English monarch. Of greatest interest to later generations was clause 39, which stated that “no free man shall be arrested or imprisoned or disseised [dispossessed] or outlawed or exiled or in any way victimised…except by the lawful judgment of his peers or by the law of the land.” This clause has been celebrated as an early guarantee of trial by jury and of habeas corpus and inspired England’s Petition of Right (1628) and the Habeas Corpus Act (1679).

In immediate terms, Magna Carta was a failure—civil war broke out the same year, and John ignored his obligations under the charter. Upon his death in 1216, however, Magna Carta was reissued with some changes by his son, King Henry III, and then reissued again in 1217. That year, the rebellious barons were defeated by the king’s forces. In 1225, Henry III voluntarily reissued Magna Carta a third time, and it formally entered English statute law.

Magna Carta has been subject to a great deal of historical exaggeration; it did not establish Parliament, as some have claimed, nor more than vaguely allude to the liberal democratic ideals of later centuries. However, as a symbol of the sovereignty of the rule of law, it was of fundamental importance to the constitutional development of England. Four original copies of Magna Carta of 1215 exist today: one in Lincoln Cathedral, one in Salisbury Cathedral, and two in the British Museum.

=> the 4mins 30 King John gets a mention.
 
OP
Joseph Cosgrove

Joseph Cosgrove

Moderator
Legionnaire
Joined
Jul 13, 2013
Messages
5,667
Reaction score
4,090
Location
Hua Hin Thailand
Best answers
1
Home Country
New Zealand
Waterloo 1815
Napoleon and France defeated by British forces under Wellington and Prussian troops under Blucher
You may recognize 'Waterloo' as the catchy 1974 tune from the Swedish pop group ABBA, where they give you a basic rundown of one of the most significant battles in history: "My My, at Waterloo, Napoleon did surrender!"

Yes, he did. After more than a decade of dominating the European continent, the French Emperor Napoleon Bonaparte had been defeated at Leipzig in 1813 and was later exiled to the island of Elba. This triumphant arrangement did not last long: Napoleon quickly escaped, starting what was known as the Hundred Days, where he assumed control of France once more. Hearing the news, his adversaries rushed together an army and went to confront him at the town of Waterloo in Belgium.

The coalition armies, controlled by the Duke of Wellington for the British and Gebhard Leberecht von Blücher for the Prussians, crushed Napoleon in the battle. When he returned to Paris, the country had turned against him, and so he abdicated for a second and final time, decisively ending the Napoleonic era. He was later exiled to the island of St. Helena in the Atlantic, where he died (having possibly been murdered) in 1821.
 

Rapace

Moderator
Joined
Oct 17, 2004
Messages
5,904
Reaction score
1,206
Location
France
Best answers
0
Home Country
France
On this day, 80 years ago (18 June, 1940), general Charles De Gaulle, having left France for England, launched his call on the BBC radio, the famous “Appel du 18 juin”, urging the French to keep fighting. This led to the creation of the movement called la France Libre (free France) and the military branch called Forces Françaises Libres. 13e DBLE, returning from the Narvik expedition to England was the first unit to join the FFL as a whole. The motto La France a perdu une bataille, mais la France n'a pas perdu la guerre (France has lost a battle, but France hasn't lost the war), often associated with the Appeal of 18 June, was actually published a couple of months later on a propaganda poster.

1592470053536.png
 
OP
Joseph Cosgrove

Joseph Cosgrove

Moderator
Legionnaire
Joined
Jul 13, 2013
Messages
5,667
Reaction score
4,090
Location
Hua Hin Thailand
Best answers
1
Home Country
New Zealand
l'appel du 18 Juin :


I know it's in French However if anyone would like to find a translation ? :unsure:

One thing that is interesting about the photo is that the photo of CDG is that it is a fake* . It is meant to show the rallying of the French. Almost no one heard it. Although BBC could be received in France, very few people listened to it at this time (even its french-speaking programme). Add to that the fact that many people were on the roads, and that radio receivers were not portable devices... However, the Appeal was printed in most french newspapers the later day as his text was relayed by the news agency Havas. But that is not how we know that photo is a fake.

A quick insight to why CDG was trying to rally the troops

Prime Minister Paul Reynaud favoured continuing the war; however, he was soon outvoted by those who advocated an armistice. Facing an untenable situation, Reynaud resigned and, on his recommendation, President Albert Lebrun appointed the 84-year-old Pétain as his replacement on 16 June 1940. The Armistice with France (Second Compiègne) agreement was signed on 22 June 1940. A separate French agreement was reached with Italy, which had entered the war against France on 10 June, well after the outcome of the battle had been decided.

Everyone remembers CDG as General De Gaulle n'est ce pas ?
De Gaulle's superiors disapproved of his views about tanks, and he was passed over for promotion to full colonel in 1936, supposedly because his service record was not good enough
.
On 21 May, at the request of propaganda officers, he gave a talk on French radio about his recent attack. In recognition for his efforts de Gaulle was promoted to the rank of temporary (acting, in Anglophone parlance) brigadier-general on 23 May 1940. Despite being compulsorily retired as a colonel on 22 June he would wear the uniform of a brigadier-general for the rest of his life.

*So how do we know that the photograph was a fake? Because the badge which you see over his left breast pocket, the order of liberation was not created by GDC until the 29th of January 1941,
 
OP
Joseph Cosgrove

Joseph Cosgrove

Moderator
Legionnaire
Joined
Jul 13, 2013
Messages
5,667
Reaction score
4,090
Location
Hua Hin Thailand
Best answers
1
Home Country
New Zealand
Sorry about that Rapace, I was verifying some facts and didn't see that you had already posted your article.
 
OP
Joseph Cosgrove

Joseph Cosgrove

Moderator
Legionnaire
Joined
Jul 13, 2013
Messages
5,667
Reaction score
4,090
Location
Hua Hin Thailand
Best answers
1
Home Country
New Zealand
OK, so that was the French version of rallying the troops.
Now let's hear the old British Bulldog's version, on the same day:

 
Top