On this day

OP
Joseph Cosgrove

Joseph Cosgrove

Moderator
Legionnaire
Joined
Jul 13, 2013
Messages
6,027
Reaction score
4,502
Location
Hua Hin Thailand
Best answers
1
Home Country
New Zealand
1602895421488.png

So what is wrong with this photo of a famous French impressionist?

BTW I thought to myself, forget it Joe, no-one is interested in the forum anymore, least of all what happened on on the 17th of October in history. Then I saw that Dusa is Back !

From out of space? Who knows, it is Dusa :ROFLMAO:

 
OP
Joseph Cosgrove

Joseph Cosgrove

Moderator
Legionnaire
Joined
Jul 13, 2013
Messages
6,027
Reaction score
4,502
Location
Hua Hin Thailand
Best answers
1
Home Country
New Zealand
Hazard du Calandrier? It's Yougo day !!!

1918 Yugoslavia proclaims itself a republic.

In case anyone's interested, I found the shortest video possible :coffee::whistle:. A word of warning, cut off the volume.

 
OP
Joseph Cosgrove

Joseph Cosgrove

Moderator
Legionnaire
Joined
Jul 13, 2013
Messages
6,027
Reaction score
4,502
Location
Hua Hin Thailand
Best answers
1
Home Country
New Zealand
1943 Burma railway completed, built by Allied POWs and Asian laborers for use of the Japanese army In early 1942 the Japanese Empire invaded and occupied Burma in Southeast Asia. This densely forested land was a nightmare to fight in, and the Japanese quickly decided that to continue their expeditions in and occupations of countries in Indochina a railway would need to be completed to supply their forces, instead of risky naval supply routes around the subcontinent. This became known as the Burma Railway, or Death Railway.

Over 180,000 civilian South Asian laborers and about 61,000 Allied prisoners of war subjected to forced labor were drafted to build the 415km (258mi) railway, from Ban Pong, Thailand, to Thanbyuzayat, Burma.

Conditions for the prisoners were extremely bad. Maltreatment, sickness and death was rife during the construction. It is estimated that 90,000 civilian laborers died during building, as well as 19,000 Allied prisoners of war. The project is considered a war crime and after the war 111 Japanese officials were tried for crimes related to the Death Railway. 31 of them were executed.

The rail is often remembered for the 1952 book and 1957 film The Bridge on the River Kwai, which depicts the construction of Bridge 277 over the River Kwai (then known as Mae Klong River). Directed by David Lean, the film starred William Holden, Jack Hawkins and Alec Guinness.

An old stamper. We've been across the re-built bridge. It was on the world's slowest train. There is a commonwealth cemetery, which is obviously paid for by Farangs because it is spotless and so well maintained. There is also a small museum which is quite interesting. Funnily enough there are no photos of any of the POWs, only drawings. The sketches are all done by the same person who has every one of the characters with blue eyes. Perhaps that is the way he sees us.
 
OP
Joseph Cosgrove

Joseph Cosgrove

Moderator
Legionnaire
Joined
Jul 13, 2013
Messages
6,027
Reaction score
4,502
Location
Hua Hin Thailand
Best answers
1
Home Country
New Zealand
OK, now that Dusa is back, that has given me a new vigor to post something a little more interesting, a little more legion.
On this day, 17 October 1854, the French and British bombarded Sevastopol (which is in the Ukraine).


DateBattleLocationCommanding OfficerResultForeign Legion Units Involved
September 20, 1854Battle of AlmaAlma River, UkraineVictoryEight companies from the 1st and 2nd Regiments of the Foreign Legion
October 17, 1854 – September 9, 1855Siege of SevastopolSevastopol, UkraineBrigadier Achille BazaineVictory1st Regiment of the Foreign Legion
2nd Regiment of the Foreign Legion
November 9, 1854Battle of InkermannSevastopol, UkraineVictory1st Regiment of the Foreign Legion
2nd Regiment of the Foreign Legion

Now I'm not certain of this, and I'm not going to bother to check, but I believe that it was during the battle of Sevastopol the pioneers earned the right to to open the defilers (parades) of the legion.
Whether it was Sev. or not, the following is true ( I'd like to remind you that I spent the last 11 months in the museum) :
During the siege, the enemy's fortifications were so strong that they were at a standstill. In those days the pioneers would open the the roads (horse and cattle tracks) in order to haul the big guns through.
Which is why they wear their leather aprons made of buffalo hide. Yes, in those days buffalos or more accurately bisons roamed the great plains of Europe. They were killed for their meat*. They (the pioneers) would use leather gloves and have a wide variety of axes depending on the terrain.
The beard: Because their life expectancy was short they were exempt from shaving before going into battle. It then became common place to distinguish a pioneer by his beard. And the longer the beard the more statue he had. I read somewhere that the pioneer must first shave on his first outing until he had seen a bit of action. which compliments the longer the beard theory.

But back to the battle. The commander of the pioneers, becoming restless with the inactive situation offered to take his men under cover of nightfall and breach an entrance in the side of the fortress. Whether he got mixed up (I mean if the man is leading a bunch of bearded guys whose life expectancy is limited, to attack a well defended fort - he didn't invent hot water !) or not, but they attacked the main entrance. They were doing so well that the legion commander ordered a full frontal attack. The rest is history.

* The Brit guards' Bearskin.
It's called a 'bearskin', a type of ceremonial military cap that dates back to the 17th century. And yes, despite some controversy, the bearskin is exactly as its name suggests. Bearskin hats are made from the skin of American black bears, taken annually during the Black Bear Cull in Canada.

Fake leopard skin is now worn by drummers in marching bands, while the smaller busby hats worn by the King's Troop are no longer made from beaver fur. Busby's were adopted in the 18th century because the brimmed hats worn by grenadiers obstructed their view when they were hurling grenades.
 

dusaboss

Hyper Active Member
Joined
Jun 3, 2016
Messages
4,096
Reaction score
1,325
Location
Serbia
Best answers
0
Home Country
Yugoslavia
Hazard du Calandrier? It's Yougo day !!!

1918 Yugoslavia proclaims itself a republic.
II wonder Joe if you making mistakes intentionally to provoke my response. :) I would write anyway

It was not proclaimed republic, it was monarchy. Was kingdom until 45. when become federation made out of made 6 republics.
 

dusaboss

Hyper Active Member
Joined
Jun 3, 2016
Messages
4,096
Reaction score
1,325
Location
Serbia
Best answers
0
Home Country
Yugoslavia
View attachment 6493

So what is wrong with this photo of a famous French impressionist?
First that's definitely not impressionism. What else? Who painted that? (He must spent awful lot of time and effort for that :))

BTW I thought to myself, forget it Joe, no-one is interested in the forum anymore,
Yeah Joe, this forum looks dead as dodo. It becoming chat room between me and you with occasional interruption from some wannabe asking couple question or some old member just saying hi.
When I see how many greens were here 5-10 y ago... I'm not getting why is that way? OK some of them didn't like direction forum is going (with me being part of problem) but that can't be reason for all of them or not even majority. I don't know, maybe we should offer free Kronenbourg? :)
 

dusaboss

Hyper Active Member
Joined
Jun 3, 2016
Messages
4,096
Reaction score
1,325
Location
Serbia
Best answers
0
Home Country
Yugoslavia
Fake leopard skin is now worn by drummers in marching bands, while the smaller busby hats worn by the King's Troop are no longer made from beaver fur. Busby's were adopted in the 18th century because the brimmed hats worn by grenadiers obstructed their view when they were hurling grenades.
Also is not really practical for combat. Tall hats are introduced (more like reintroduced. they were used all through history for same reasons) so solder would look bigger and intimate enemy. Obviously that's working and difference of enemy running away (tactfully withdrawing :)) immediately instead of later when couple hundreds of them and your soldiers get killed is significant.
When range and efficiency of guns increased so bayonet charges and close range combat stopped to be common in battles, there was no point in intimidating enemy that way. Also big guy with rifle isn't more dangerous than small guy with rifle so ...

Last (I think) remains of tall hats are German pickelhaube last used in early years of ww1. And no, that spike is not designed to stab someone if you lose your weapon. :)
 
Joined
Jan 14, 2006
Messages
3,733
Reaction score
1,600
Location
U.K.
Best answers
0
Home Country
United Kingdom
Dusaboss,

You have never been part of the problem for the forum being as dead as a dodo.

Possibly Greens believe they have contributed enough and other than aged experience have now little to offer.

As for myself, I retain fond memories of my service. However no-one is interested with people of my vintage trained by former WW2, Korean and Malayan veterans posting. We are now aged dinosaurs.

What is urgently needed is some recent serving Greens otherwise the forum will founder and that would be a great shame.

Finally Dusa, keep posting, stay safe and good luck whatever you do !
 
OP
Joseph Cosgrove

Joseph Cosgrove

Moderator
Legionnaire
Joined
Jul 13, 2013
Messages
6,027
Reaction score
4,502
Location
Hua Hin Thailand
Best answers
1
Home Country
New Zealand
II wonder Joe if you making mistakes intentionally to provoke my response. :) I would write anyway

It was not proclaimed republic, it was monarchy. Was kingdom until 45. when become federation made out of made 6 republics.

I'm so sorry Dusa :cry: (said with tongue in cheek :ROFLMAO:) I usually check out my facts before posting, in case there's a smart alec on here, who thinks he knows better than me :coffee::whistle:. Anyway, thanks for you response !
 
OP
Joseph Cosgrove

Joseph Cosgrove

Moderator
Legionnaire
Joined
Jul 13, 2013
Messages
6,027
Reaction score
4,502
Location
Hua Hin Thailand
Best answers
1
Home Country
New Zealand
It's called Le bateau which I think is French. If anyone can confirm that and give its translation in Yougo, it would be much appreciated.
1602988233869.png It was hung upside down ! I kid you not.

Le Bateau caused a minor stir when the Museum of Modern Art, New York, which housed it, hung the work upside-down for 47 days in 1961 until Genevieve Habert, a stockbroker, noticed the mistake and notified a guard*. Habert later informed the New York Times, which in turn notified Monroe Wheeler, the Museum's art director. As a result, the artwork was rehung properly.
The museum currently houses the piece in the "Final Works of Henri Matisse**" exhibition.

** Henri Émile Benoît Matisse 31 December 1869 – 3 November 1954) was a French artist, known for both his use of colour and his fluid and original draughtsmanship. He was a draughtsman, printmaker, and sculptor, but is known primarily as a painter. Matisse is commonly regarded, along with Pablo Picasso, as one of the artists who best helped to define the revolutionary developments in the visual arts throughout the opening decades of the twentieth century, responsible for significant developments in painting and sculpture.

*I'm told is currently seeking employment elsewhere.
 

Attachments

OP
Joseph Cosgrove

Joseph Cosgrove

Moderator
Legionnaire
Joined
Jul 13, 2013
Messages
6,027
Reaction score
4,502
Location
Hua Hin Thailand
Best answers
1
Home Country
New Zealand
Today on the 18th of October, the US signs a check over to the Russians for the sale of Alaska:
As Russia completed its eastward expansion through Siberia, the country inevitably crossed the Bering Strait and established a presence in the northern Americas. This territory, first settled in the early 17th century, was known as Alaska, but very few Russians ever moved there.

Russia was damaged militarily by its defeat in the Crimean War, in which Britain and its ally France defeated the Empire. Russian Tsar Alexander II began looking for ways to sell Alaska to America, especially as the territory would be impossible to defend if Britain decided to attack it. (Britain held Canada as a colony at the time of the sale.)

After the American Civil War concluded, negotiations began on selling Alaska to America, though opinion in both countries was against the deal. Many Russians did not want to give away a territory where gold had been discovered, and Americans did not want an 'ice-box' where very few people lived.

On March 30, 1867*, the two countries agreed on a purely symbolic sum of $7.2 million ($109 million in 2018), about 2 cents an acre. America had purchased 586,412 square miles (1,518,800 km2) of territory. Alaska would not be admitted as a state to the Union until 1959, and it remained sparsely populated until a gold rush in the late 19th century.

1602989391889.png
* Check out the date on the check. Luckily it didn't bounce **

**
The term comes from the fact that the cheque was rubber stamped RD (refer to drawer) and returned to the payee. It appeared to bounce out of the bank and back to him.
Which brings up the question why in French so say un chèque en bois a wooden check? I mean paper is made out of wood (and not rubber:ROFLMAO:, I'm on a roll here lads ! "Wow, look at the kid go")
***.

***Anyone here remember John Denver?

OK everyone knows that it was Alexander II was the Emperor of Russia, King of Poland and Grand Duke of Finland from 2 March 1855 until his assassination on 13 March 1881, who sold it but who bought it?
 
Joined
Nov 18, 2018
Messages
85
Reaction score
49
Location
ISRAEL
Best answers
0
Home Country
Armenia
Today on the 18th of October, the US signs a check over to the Russians for the sale of Alaska:
As Russia completed its eastward expansion through Siberia, the country inevitably crossed the Bering Strait and established a presence in the northern Americas. This territory, first settled in the early 17th century, was known as Alaska, but very few Russians ever moved there.

Russia was damaged militarily by its defeat in the Crimean War, in which Britain and its ally France defeated the Empire. Russian Tsar Alexander II began looking for ways to sell Alaska to America, especially as the territory would be impossible to defend if Britain decided to attack it. (Britain held Canada as a colony at the time of the sale.)

After the American Civil War concluded, negotiations began on selling Alaska to America, though opinion in both countries was against the deal. Many Russians did not want to give away a territory where gold had been discovered, and Americans did not want an 'ice-box' where very few people lived.

On March 30, 1867*, the two countries agreed on a purely symbolic sum of $7.2 million ($109 million in 2018), about 2 cents an acre. America had purchased 586,412 square miles (1,518,800 km2) of territory. Alaska would not be admitted as a state to the Union until 1959, and it remained sparsely populated until a gold rush in the late 19th century.

View attachment 6496
* Check out the date on the check. Luckily it didn't bounce **

**
The term comes from the fact that the cheque was rubber stamped RD (refer to drawer) and returned to the payee. It appeared to bounce out of the bank and back to him.
Which brings up the question why in French so say un chèque en bois a wooden check? I mean paper is made out of wood (and not rubber:ROFLMAO:, I'm on a roll here lads ! "Wow, look at the kid go")
***.

***Anyone here remember John Denver?

OK everyone knows that it was Alexander II was the Emperor of Russia, King of Poland and Grand Duke of Finland from 2 March 1855 until his assassination on 13 March 1881, who sold it but who bought it?
U.S. Secretary of State William henry Seward entered into negotiations with Russian minister Eduard de Stoeckl for the purchase of Alaska. Seward and Stoeckl agreed to a treaty on March 30, 1867, and the treaty was ratified by the United States Senate by a wide margin despite clashes between President Andrew Johnson and Congress over Reconstruction.
 

dusaboss

Hyper Active Member
Joined
Jun 3, 2016
Messages
4,096
Reaction score
1,325
Location
Serbia
Best answers
0
Home Country
Yugoslavia
It's called Le bateau which I think is French. If anyone can confirm that and give its translation in Yougo, it would be much appreciated.
View attachment 6495 It was hung upside down ! I kid you not.

Le Bateau caused a minor stir when the Museum of Modern Art, New York, which housed it, hung the work upside-down for 47 days in 1961 until Genevieve Habert, a stockbroker, noticed the mistake and notified a guard*. Habert later informed the New York Times, which in turn notified Monroe Wheeler, the Museum's art director. As a result, the artwork was rehung properly.
The museum currently houses the piece in the "Final Works of Henri Matisse**" exhibition.

** Henri Émile Benoît Matisse 31 December 1869 – 3 November 1954) was a French artist, known for both his use of colour and his fluid and original draughtsmanship. He was a draughtsman, printmaker, and sculptor, but is known primarily as a painter. Matisse is commonly regarded, along with Pablo Picasso, as one of the artists who best helped to define the revolutionary developments in the visual arts throughout the opening decades of the twentieth century, responsible for significant developments in painting and sculpture.

*I'm told is currently seeking employment elsewhere.
I hope someone did that intentionally as revolt do crappy modern "art" with this "painting is". C'mon, do really matter if this painting is upside down or on its sides? No! Its same piece of crap rotate it as you wish. :). There is many stupid people in world of art appreciation something just because someone told them that is masterpiece. In this case this is appreciated just because is work of famous painter.He made some nice real pictures, but he also made like this one more BS art.
Modern art, pop art 99% of it it's just pieces of crap someone decided to call art. And then some other idiots decide to pay millions for same crap. :) Unbelievable.
They say we don't understand art. No because in this case there is nothing to be understood!
 

Crawdad

Member
Joined
Jun 13, 2015
Messages
358
Reaction score
455
Location
Bayou Coq D'Indes
Best answers
0
Home Country
United States
Welcome back, Dusa. Not gonna lie, I was worried that you got the 'Rona or something.

'Bateau' is indeed French for 'boat'; "чамац" in Serbian according to google translate. The painting is of a sailboat, although it's hard to tell by looking at it.
 

dusaboss

Hyper Active Member
Joined
Jun 3, 2016
Messages
4,096
Reaction score
1,325
Location
Serbia
Best answers
0
Home Country
Yugoslavia
Welcome back, Dusa. Not gonna lie, I was worried that you got the 'Rona or something.
Nah, Im just fine. F-ing Corona? :) If I die from that max-hyped up disease, I'm gonna kill myself. :)

'Bateau' is indeed French for 'boat'; "чамац" in Serbian according to google translate. The painting is of a sailboat, although it's hard to tell by looking at it.
I kinda got it that is sailboat still ... do you think that is great work of art? (or work of art at all) Would you stand long time in front of that painting admiring for painter's effort, technique, originality or emotion that "art" provokes in you? I don't think so.
Near end of his life Salvador Dali made crappy driving with couple movies of pen, signed it and sold those for couple k-dollars. Or he would just sign empty piece of papers and sold it for couple hundreds. Does his sign and fact that he painted some of best paintings of all time make those empty peppers artwork? Ofcourse not!
 
OP
Joseph Cosgrove

Joseph Cosgrove

Moderator
Legionnaire
Joined
Jul 13, 2013
Messages
6,027
Reaction score
4,502
Location
Hua Hin Thailand
Best answers
1
Home Country
New Zealand
I hope someone did that intentionally as revolt do crappy modern "art" with this "painting is". C'mon, do really matter if this painting is upside down or on its sides? No! Its same piece of crap rotate it as you wish. :). There is many stupid people in world of art appreciation something just because someone told them that is masterpiece. In this case this is appreciated just because is work of famous painter.He made some nice real pictures, but he also made like this one more BS art.
Modern art, pop art 99% of it it's just pieces of crap someone decided to call art. And then some other idiots decide to pay millions for same crap. :) Unbelievable.
They say we don't understand art. No because in this case there is nothing to be understood!
Dusa, Come on !

1603066617993.png

120 building bricks bought by the Tate Gallery in the 70's for 12, 000 Pounds from a dude called Carl André. Now that's what I call art and the prestigious Tate Gallery of London agrees with me.
I forget it's name. I'd appreciate if anyone could help me out. :unsure:
 

voltigeur

Legionnaire
Joined
Oct 17, 2004
Messages
4,318
Reaction score
658
Location
Canada
Best answers
2
Home Country
Canada
First that's definitely not impressionism. What else? Who painted that? (He must spent awful lot of time and effort for that :))


Yeah Joe, this forum looks dead as dodo. It becoming chat room between me and you with occasional interruption from some wannabe asking couple question or some old member just saying hi.
When I see how many greens were here 5-10 y ago... I'm not getting why is that way? OK some of them didn't like direction forum is going (with me being part of problem) but that can't be reason for all of them or not even majority. I don't know, maybe we should offer free Kronenbourg? :)
I think that the main reason for the lack of interest in this forum is that most wanabees now get their info from face book.
Furthermore, anciens like myself have nothing new to add to the information and can only repeat the answers they heard before from the younger anciens.
You will find many former greens on FB in the various military groups.
 

dusaboss

Hyper Active Member
Joined
Jun 3, 2016
Messages
4,096
Reaction score
1,325
Location
Serbia
Best answers
0
Home Country
Yugoslavia
Dusa, Come on !

View attachment 6498

120 building bricks bought by the Tate Gallery in the 70's for 12, 000 Pounds from a dude called Carl André. Now that's what I call art and the prestigious Tate Gallery of London agrees with me.
I forget it's name. I'd appreciate if anyone could help me out. :unsure:
I can't to admire beauty of this sculpture, talent of artist and amount of work he put in this masterpiece.
 
Top