Opération “Barkhane”

Perun

Super Active Member
Joined
Jan 24, 2013
Messages
1,181
Reaction score
326
Location
Zagreb
Best answers
0
Home Country
Croatia
No problem, I wouldn't want people to think I'm illiterate. ;)
 

Le petit caporal

Legionnaire
Joined
Sep 4, 2017
Messages
3,832
Reaction score
2,505
Location
Nimes
Best answers
1
Home Country
North Korea
What is the adverb for, when the student corrects the teacher ? I know there is one but cannot remember now.
Ta.
 

hotsauced

Member
Joined
Jul 31, 2017
Messages
104
Reaction score
102
Location
Los Angeles
Best answers
0
Home Country
United States
Am needing some help here, please, to the caring
Need a link posted
Source is : Medium.com
The title of the article is “From Salisbury Plain to the deserts of Mali”.
Ta in advance
L.P.C.






1596193791371.png
From Salisbury Plain to the deserts of Mali

British troops recently took part in a 14-day long exercise in the South-west as they prepare for their deployment to the United Nations mission in the gruelling deserts in West Africa



Ministry of Defence

Follow

Jul 29 · 4 min read

In the distance, a convoy of British troops in armoured vehicles snake their way through the barren 300 square-mile plain. They stop and search obstacles, slowly but meticulously they make their way onto their objective.

The heat on Salisbury was blistering, but nothing compared to what these men and women will experience in Mali. As the patrol makes their way deeper into the rural countryside the soldiers from the Light Dragoons and 2 Royal Anglian are faced with a variety of life-like scenarios, testing their ability to deal with challenges they will likely face in Mali.

These scenes this July form part of months of preparations where the soldiers are honing their skills before deploying to support the United Nations Peacekeeping Operation known as MINUSMA.

British troops will not be there to take the fight to the extremist enemy in West Africa, moreover, the soldiers will conduct patrols in their Jackal and Foxhound armoured vehicles, gathering intelligence that will help the UN mission protect lives and bring Mali towards peace and stability. But if required, the Task Group are well experienced and equipped to react to threats and defend themselves

1596193978070.png
Commanding Officer of the Light Dragoons, Lieutenant Colonel Robinson

“This exercise is part of an intensive training package. Over recent months we have been honing our specialist skills and now we have brought all aspects of the Task Group together to operate as a highly professional and effective peacekeeping force.

1596194086121.png
Major Black engaging with a local leader (simulated scenario using actors).

The soon-to-be UN Peacekeepers were put through their paces at engaging with locals and navigating the cultural challenges that they may face in-country. Running into disgruntled locals while on patrols, meeting with village leaders to understand the situation and gather information, they even dealt with a ‘shoot and scoot’ from a mock-insurgent which saw medics springing into action to deal with simulated casualties. With the efficiency and professionalism that these future peacekeepers dealt with the incoming challenges, you would never think that this was the first time that the Task Group has come together.

1596194165305.png
A patrol runs into disgruntled locals (simulated scenario using actors).

It’s easy to make a comparison between this upcoming tour and the UK’s deployment to Afghanistan more than a decade ago but this is a new force with a very different mission. These infantry and cavalry troops will be deploying as a Long-Range Reconnaissance Task Group, which will see self-sufficient patrols immersed in the arid West African bush for anything up to 30 days. These are Non-combat, peacekeeping troops, which means as part of the UN mission, their prime responsibility is to protect civilians.

1596194415435.png
Troops identify the enemy moments after a ‘scoot and shoot’ training serial.

It was clear that the design of this force structure was unique, carrying everything they needed to survive with them over potentially hundreds of miles required careful planning and training.

What sets this group apart from other deployments is their ability to transport a field hospital with them while on the move, which if needed, can spring up a fully functioning operating theatre within an hour. Meaning that life-saving medical care can be delivered at pace, when and where it is required.

1596194536660.png
Medics from the Royal Army Medical Corps prepare to receive simulated casualties at their pop-up field hospital on Salisbury Plain.

While on the Plain, Army medics demonstrated the speed and efficiency in which they can spring into action — transforming what looked like a small barn into a working surgical tent in under 45 minutes while still being able to treat patients. In this scenario local civilians had been injured in an IED blast, this was a key demonstration of how this Task Group can directly save lives in Mali.

1596194665796.png
The task force stop to check for IEDs on a patrol.

Marked by chronic poverty, instability and high levels of gender inequality, the Sahel remains one of Africa’s most fragile regions. The UK contribution to this UN Mission will help towards making this region of the world a safer and more stable place.

We are bringing top-class British expertise to the areas of greatest need in UN peacekeeping missions.

1596194808395.png
A soldier from the Royal Anglian regiment provides force protection for a Chinook helicopter as civilian casualties are evacuated from the exercise.
 
Last edited by a moderator:
OP
Joseph Cosgrove

Joseph Cosgrove

Moderator
Legionnaire
Joined
Jul 13, 2013
Messages
5,931
Reaction score
4,392
Location
Hua Hin Thailand
Best answers
1
Home Country
New Zealand
Le petit caporal,
here it is

(if it will work)
Thanks Perun,
A very good article, LPC, I would strongly recommend that you copy and paste it. If you like I could do it for you. It goes to show that the Brits are doing their part, although it has to be said that they are already in Mali with a detachment of Work Horses.
 

Le petit caporal

Legionnaire
Joined
Sep 4, 2017
Messages
3,832
Reaction score
2,505
Location
Nimes
Best answers
1
Home Country
North Korea
What I would like to know, is...
Have any U.K. S.F. been or going to be deployed to Barkhane...
It was promised at the Pau Summit... okay, with the COVID crap, the agenda might have been rescheduled...
Any info, will be muchly appreciated
 
Joined
Apr 8, 2019
Messages
225
Reaction score
289
Location
USA
Best answers
0
Home Country
United States
What Gen de Lattre meant I guess is your question, right (I'm quoting him)? Maybe something got lost in translation, but he basically meant that in this type of low intensity (“guerrilla”) conflict, small units officers (up and to and including company level) have greater responsibilities in the conduct of operations than in other form of conflicts. That's also what the article of the MinDef web site says, so 70 years after, the situation is pretty similar from that standpoint. Just making an historical parallel... With this statement, de Lattre also vowed to provide “lieutenants and captains” with all the support they needed to execute their mission, implicitly saying that it might not have been the priority of his predecessors.
It is my perception that there is a separation or distinction between Officers and enlisted. I think the General was not including the enlisted men in this statement. In a book about US Marine Chesty Puller, it talks about how he always treated the lieutenants like they were lower than say a sergeant... All I’ve done is read though.
 
OP
Joseph Cosgrove

Joseph Cosgrove

Moderator
Legionnaire
Joined
Jul 13, 2013
Messages
5,931
Reaction score
4,392
Location
Hua Hin Thailand
Best answers
1
Home Country
New Zealand
Requiescat In Pace
FRENCH MILITARY MEMBER OF THE BARKHANE FORCE ACCIDENTALLY KILLED WHILE OPERATING IN CHAD


1596236043766.png
Brigadier-chief Andy Fila, who died this Friday in Chad. - Army Staff


Andy Fila, a 25-year-old French soldier, died "accidentally" while operating outside Chad on Friday.A French military member of the Barkhane force died "accidentally" in operation in Chad this Friday, we learned from the General Staff of the Armed Forces.Andy Fila, 25 years old and father of a child, was brigadier-chief of the 14th Infantry Regiment of Parachute Logistics Support (RISLP) of Toulouse.Hit by an explosion This Friday, "while carrying out a maintenance intervention on a refrigeration unit at the Kossei base in N'Djamena in Chad, the brigadier-chief, electromechanic refrigeration engineer of the Barkhane force was fatally affected by the explosion of a equipment ", reports the press release from the Ministry of the Armed Forces. "In spite of the immediate support by the emergency services on the spot, he died of the consequences of his injuries", it is specified in the document.An investigation by the provost gendarmerie is underway to determine the exact circumstances of the accident, adds the ministry.
At the National Assembly, at the request of deputy LR Thibault Bazin, the deputies spontaneously paid tribute to this soldier, observing a minute of silence, on the sidelines of the examination of the bioethics bill.
 

mark wake

Legionnaire
Joined
Jun 12, 2013
Messages
1,044
Reaction score
906
Location
connecticut
Best answers
0
Home Country
United States
Requiescat In Pace
FRENCH MILITARY MEMBER OF THE BARKHANE FORCE ACCIDENTALLY KILLED WHILE OPERATING IN CHAD


View attachment 6386
Brigadier-chief Andy Fila, who died this Friday in Chad. - Army Staff


Andy Fila, a 25-year-old French soldier, died "accidentally" while operating outside Chad on Friday.A French military member of the Barkhane force died "accidentally" in operation in Chad this Friday, we learned from the General Staff of the Armed Forces.Andy Fila, 25 years old and father of a child, was brigadier-chief of the 14th Infantry Regiment of Parachute Logistics Support (RISLP) of Toulouse.Hit by an explosion This Friday, "while carrying out a maintenance intervention on a refrigeration unit at the Kossei base in N'Djamena in Chad, the brigadier-chief, electromechanic refrigeration engineer of the Barkhane force was fatally affected by the explosion of a equipment ", reports the press release from the Ministry of the Armed Forces. "In spite of the immediate support by the emergency services on the spot, he died of the consequences of his injuries", it is specified in the document.An investigation by the provost gendarmerie is underway to determine the exact circumstances of the accident, adds the ministry.
At the National Assembly, at the request of deputy LR Thibault Bazin, the deputies spontaneously paid tribute to this soldier, observing a minute of silence, on the sidelines of the examination of the bioethics bill.
So sad. RIP.
 

Rapace

Moderator
Joined
Oct 17, 2004
Messages
5,926
Reaction score
1,259
Location
France
Best answers
0
Home Country
France
Nice article about 2e REI back from a deployment in Mali. Not the kind of article expected on a paper like “Le Monde” which is generally considered as a "liberal" type of media (for the Americans, a bit like the New York Times, or The Guardian in the UK). All in French, but I'll try to post an English translation when I have time.


31 Juillet 2020, Deuxième regiment étranger d'infanterie, à Nîmes. Les hommes de la première compagnie, de retour du mali, en formation sur la place d'arme, pour le changement de capitaine, sous lequel ils serviront les deux prochaines années."EDOUARD ELIAS POUR « LE MONDE »

« Si on a cinq minutes, on mange ; dix, on dort » : les légionnaires de « Barkhane » racontent leur infernale mission au Mali

Depuis février, les soldats du 2e régiment étranger d’infanterie traquaient les djihadistes de l’organisation Etat islamique dans le grand Sahara. Récit d’un mandat exceptionnel.

C’est un temps de retrouvailles après cinq mois de guerre. Celui des accolades et de la bière fraîche, des cérémonies, aussi. Le moment des « Vos gueules là-dedans ! » criés parmi les officiers réunis, quand on ordonne le silence pour saluer celui qui est muté. Celui aussi du toujours attendu « La main dessus ! », qui livre les buffets aux appétits tandis que les cigales chantent sous la chaleur de midi.

Le 2e régiment étranger d’infanterie (REI) rentre du Mali. Ce 29 juillet, la dernière compagnie franchit les grilles du quartier Chabrières, à Nîmes. A l’ombre des platanes de la place d’armes, les revenants débarquent, képi blanc sur la tête, masque chirurgical sur la bouche. Ils saisissent leur paquetage en silence sous l’œil voilé de fatigue de leur chef. On n’attendait plus qu’eux. « Maintenant, nous devons d’abord retrouver notre première famille, qui est au régiment. Réintégrer notre propre maison, qui est ici », salue le major Joselito, dont les cheveux grisonnent après trente et un ans de Légion étrangère.

Au Mali, ce furent cinq mois ininterrompus de feu, de sable, de nuits sans sommeil. Ordre avait été passé en janvier d’effacer l’organisation Etat islamique dans le grand Sahara (EIGS) du terrain sahélien. Dans l’opération « Barkhane », ce fut donc le tour des légionnaires. Le « mandat Légion », se réjouissent-ils aujourd’hui. Car les régiments étrangers ont été envoyés en masse : parachutistes de Calvi, cavaliers de Carpiagne, sapeurs de Laudun. Les fantassins de Nîmes sont arrivés début février au Sahel avec leurs véhicules blindés de combat d’infanterie. La manœuvre ? Si l’on écoute le chef des opérations, le lieutenant-colonel Pierre, elle se dessine d’une ligne claire. « Déployer un maximum de monde sur le terrain, de façon durable. »

« Chercher l’ennemi là où il évolue »
Les légionnaires la voulaient, cette traque des djihadistes. Chacun de ces professionnels du combat réclamait sa part du bilan. Ils l’ont eue. Harcèlement, fouilles et ratissage, combat d’infanterie débarqué, neutralisations à chaque occasion. Ce fut un mandat exceptionnel. Cela faisait longtemps que la quasi-totalité du régiment n’était pas partie ainsi, avec 900 hommes : le groupe « Dragon » a rempli sa mission. « Le pur bonheur, il est là, faire le métier pour lequel on est payé, chercher l’ennemi là où il évolue, tout connaître de ses chemins, jusqu’au marché où il s’approvisionne », note le major Joselito. Ils peuvent s’exprimer ainsi car, répètent-ils tous, « tout le monde est rentré ». Ni tué ni blessé grave. Un tiers de ces soldats, 26 ans en moyenne, ont vécu en 2020 leur première opération extérieure sous le drapeau français.

Les hommes de la quatrième compagnie, de retour du Mali, vérifient qu’il ne manque aucune pièce de l’armement, à Nîmes, le 31 juillet.

Les hommes de la quatrième compagnie, de retour du Mali, vérifient qu’il ne manque aucune pièce de l’armement, à Nîmes, le 31 juillet. EDOUARD ELIAS POUR "LE MONDE"

Le « 2e étranger » a lancé ses compagnies dans le Gourma, région du Mali située sous le fleuve, entre Tombouctou et Gao. C’est dans cette zone frontalière du Niger et du Burkina que sévit l’EIGS. Les officiers l’évoquent comme une « zone de chasse ». Un plat désert mité d’arbustes avares d’ombre, des pistes sournoises dont les enfonçures attendent de briser les véhicules, des sols où toute plante porte des épines. Quand les légionnaires y ont pris place, l’armée malienne était durement frappée par la guérilla djihadiste. « Il fallait stopper la dégradation de la situation et générer du bilan », assure le colonel Arnaud Guerry qui passera le commandement du régiment d’ici à quelques jours. Du bilan : empêcher, capturer, tuer les combattants de l’EIGS, donc. « Les actions de combat ont systématiquement tourné à notre avantage. »

« Pas de demi-mesure »
Les officiers évoquent « un rythme très soutenu ». Autant dire infernal. Les militaires sur le terrain ont mené des opérations ininterrompues, d’une durée de quatre à six semaines, loin des bases du secteur, les villes de Gao et de Gossi. Ils ont agi le jour et la nuit, sans discontinuer, jusqu’à six nuits par semaine, souhaitant surgir au petit jour là où leurs adversaires ne les attendaient plus. « Au Mali, pas de demi-mesure », raconte le lieutenant Walter, un petit blond au visage brûlé par le soleil qui a commandé la section commando du régiment. « Les nuits sont soit si noires qu’on n’y voit pas à deux pas même avec nos visions nocturnes, soit aussi claires que le jour. »

Le colonel Arnaud Guerry, chef de corps du régiment, pose devant le mémorial, à Nîmes, le 31 juillet.

Le colonel Arnaud Guerry, chef de corps du régiment, pose devant le mémorial, à Nîmes, le 31 juillet. EDOUARD ELIAS POUR « LE MONDE »

Le mois de mai fut le plus exigeant sur le plan physique, quand les températures ont grimpé à 47 °C. Ancien soldat de Sa Majesté, le caporal Greg, 30 ans et tatoué comme un rebelle, semble droit sorti d’un groupe de rock de Liverpool. Il lève les mains d’un geste fataliste : « Le jour… la nuit… le job… ce n’est pas le problème. Le truc chiant, c’est la chaleur ! Je suis anglais ! » Pas de quoi gâcher le plaisir. « C’était ma première opération extérieure. C’était une bonne aventure. »

Dans les récits, le pas des hommes, l’allonge des blindés affichent des jauges précises. « Des raids sur 140 km à fond de train la journée ». « Des infiltrations motorisées sur 50 km la nuit, la fin du chemin se faisant à pied sur 15 km supplémentaires. » Quand vivait-on ? « Il faut profiter de tous les instants », a appris Walter. « Si on a cinq minutes, on mange, si on en a dix, on dort. » Mais quand la troupe est disciplinée et le cadre attentif à ses hommes, l’entraide fait le reste, affirme le jeune lieutenant. On avance. Toujours. La compagnie logistique ne s’est jamais arrêtée de tourner entre les postes isolés des légionnaires, depuis les bases de Gao et de Gossi. Trois jours de trajet pour les camions bourrés jusqu’à la gueule d’eau et de matériel, un jour sur place, trois jours de retour, un jour de rechargement. En avant.
 

Rapace

Moderator
Joined
Oct 17, 2004
Messages
5,926
Reaction score
1,259
Location
France
Best answers
0
Home Country
France
« Résistance mentale »
Dans les blindés, la climatisation devait prioritairement protéger les systèmes de combat et il fallait économiser le carburant avant de rafraîchir les hommes. Le sergent-chef mécanicien, Eddie, a vécu comme à la mine cinq mois durant. « Le chef te dit dès le matin : “Il faut que ça roule”, et tu commences à cogiter. La journée, on roule. La nuit, on répare. C’est la surchauffe. Le délai, le délai ! Voilà le mot-clé. » Trop de pression ? En passant ses mains sur son visage doux, le légionnaire malgache éclate de rire : « Je ris parce que c’est fini ! »

Le « 2e étranger » a connu une vingtaine d’affrontements avec les groupes armés du Mali. « A 20 mètres » de l’ennemi dans certains cas, signale un légionnaire. Nul n’a jamais sous-estimé cet adversaire du Sahel, accrocheur, déterminé. Il a tué en mai deux légionnaires d’un autre régiment. La fausse tranquillité des bivouacs est entrée dans la mémoire du sergent Josua, le Sud-Africain aux yeux turquoise. « C’est quand on se repose qu’il faut faire le plus attention. » Son groupe a capturé un cadre de l’EIGS. « Pour vous, on peut dire que le bilan est fait », l’a félicité le général de « Barkhane ». Le sergent a 24 ans, la plupart de ses hommes vivaient leur premier engagement. « A la Légion, témoigne-t-il, j’ai appris la résistance mentale. »

Le succès, à les entendre, est affaire de préparation à la guerre. « On s’est entraînés très durement avant de partir. On se prépare exactement à ce genre de chose. C’est toujours une satisfaction de voir que le travail paie », balaie le capitaine Jordan, à la tête de la 4e compagnie. L’entraînement les a poussés dans leurs retranchements ; ils ont répété les gestes du combat jusqu’au réflexe. Il reste à comprendre cette endurance, cette capacité inouïe à encaisser. « Tant que son chef est bon avec lui, le respecte et lui donne des ordres cohérents, le légionnaire va au bout de la mission », estime le commandant Dominique, à l’état-major. « La limite est celle d’un homme. Ils viennent toujours de la misère pour s’engager, mais toujours pour l’aventure. » Certains se consument à ce contact. Ce n’est pas le sujet, en ces jours de retour d’opérations.


Le capitaine Jordan, commandant les hommes de la quatrième compagnie au Mali, pose dans son bureau, à Nîmes, le 31 juillet. EDOUARD ELIAS POUR « LE MONDE »

Renoncer aux extras
« On a peu de limites humaines, avec la Légion étrangère », admet le capitaine Jordan. Au Mali il n’y eut pas même un coup de chaud, mortel au sens médical du terme. On a déshabillé, arrosé et ventilé des gars, parfois. Evacué ceux qui étaient atteints de coliques néphrétiques. Sur les postes isolés du Gourma, l’ordinaire ne pouvait être amélioré. Le Covid, mais aussi une fièvre frappant le bétail dans la région, a contraint les légionnaires à renoncer aux extras pour agrémenter les rations. Entre la déshydratation et l’effort, ils ont perdu 10 à 15 kg.

Le médecin chef Xavier se réjouit que l’on ait « gardé un haut niveau opérationnel sans aucune blessure de guerre à déplorer ». Pour le toubib, aussi solide que ses patients dans son treillis, « sans parler d’exploit, le légionnaire est quelqu’un qui est capable de faire une marche de 50 km avec sac au dos et armement, de tenir jusqu’à cent jours sur le terrain, tout en appliquant les règles d’hygiène qui permettent de durer ».

En cette fin juillet, au quartier Chabrières, on attend donc les permissions avec la satisfaction du devoir accompli et une fatigue que l’on tait. On a « fait du bilan », même si l’état-major à Paris refuse de donner le nombre d’ennemis tués par « Barkhane » – sûrement plus de 600 depuis le début 2020 – ou celui des prisonniers. Le colonel Guerry évoque la neutralisation d’un artificier important de l’EIGS, de plusieurs poseurs d’engins explosifs. Il cite les milliers de munitions saisies, les tonnes de matériel prêt à fabriquer des bombes, le renseignement accumulé.


Au centre, l'aumônier militaire, en tenue de cérémonie et de retour du Mali, rejoint la place d'armes pour la passation de commandement. EDOUARD ELIAS POUR « LE MONDE »

Aux plus jeunes qui ont éprouvé leur âme, l’aumônier a cru bon de rappeler la doctrine de l’Eglise : « Un militaire agit sous l’uniforme, et le feu est toujours délivré dans le cadre de la légitime défense. » Le curé, un Breton de Cesson-Sévigné (Ille-et-Vilaine), s’est déplacé de poste en poste dans le Gourma, lui aussi, pour délivrer des mots encore plus clairs. Face à l’ennemi, « c’est toi, ou lui », a-t-il rappelé aux légionnaires. Dans son bureau-chambre à Nîmes, sous un petit portrait du pape François, il assure que « cela remet les choses en place et permet de poursuivre la mission dans un esprit apaisé ».

Sas de décompression
Le 10 mai, la 2e compagnie avait commencé la traque d’un groupe de vingt combattants, qui lui ont filé entre les doigts à plusieurs reprises. Quatre jours plus tard, quand les djihadistes ont commis l’erreur d’allumer un téléphone portable, une opération de frappe française comprenant un drone a eu raison d’eux. Les hommes de Nîmes ont peigné le sol pour « l’évaluation » du bombardement. Des corps ennemis pulvérisés, ils ne parlent pas. Le colonel évoque « un moment difficile ». Le retour à la caserne possède la vertu d’un sas de décompression, juge le médecin. « Les gens peuvent rediscuter entre eux de leurs actions de combat, faire un récit commun avant de partir en repos. » Après ce mandat « Barkhane » si intense, il guette les blessures psychiques. Pour l’heure, quelques signaux d’alerte, sans plus. « Il faut rester humble, cela vient plus tard. »


Deux soldats de la quatrième compagnie, de retour du Mali, dans leur chambrée. 31 juillet. EDOUARD ELIAS POUR "LE MONDE"

Mais, pour ces soldats venus du monde entier, ce n’est jamais assez. La plupart parlent déjà de repartir. Après cinq mois de guerre, il faut juste retrouver forme humaine. Le « 2e étranger » remise donc ses armes et se rassemble. Tensions et incompatibilités d’humeur doivent se taire. Rendez-vous à « l’oasis », la terrasse conviviale de la caserne.

Debout au micro, un capitaine taillé à la serpe passe le relais à son successeur, saluant le travail de ses caporaux serrés sous les mûriers, tandis que les grillades sifflent sur les barbecues. « Nous avons bien travaillé, et nous avons été chanceux, aussi, ne l’oublions pas. » Chacun sait qu’à l’été 2018, deux compagnies du régiment ont manqué de cette chance à Gao, quand un véhicule-suicide a blessé lourdement quatre soldats. Venu de Biélorussie, le caporal-chef Vladimir y a laissé son dos, brûlé, sa jambe, pulvérisée, et une part de ses rêves, qui ont cédé la place aux cauchemars. Après dix-huit mois d’hôpital, son espoir, aujourd’hui, colle à l’atmosphère à la fois grave et légère des retrouvailles. « Je peux me tenir debout. J’aimerais bientôt reprendre le vélo. »
 

Most viewed threads of the week

Top