Opinions about the Dutch Air Mobile Brigade?

Domenique1990

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Does any legionnaire or other veteran have any experience to share in regards to the Dutch Air Mobile Brigade (during deployments or exercises)? Since I know the French Foreign Legion and the Air Mobile Brigade participate in join training exercises, so I am interested in hearing your opinions.

To me it looks like the Dutch Air Mobile Brigade is more focused on peacekeeping operations, and not so much on war. The daily life of the Air Mobile soldier during his four year contract seems to revolve more around never ending physical exercises, some bi-lateral training exercises and peacekeeping missions.

But never combat missions such as the recent French intervention in Mali. The Dutch military is always deployed after the major fighting is over (such as the Dutch contingent in Iraq, and the Dutch contingent in Afghanistan). So what are your thoughts, is it a competent fighting force? As in would you feel relieved if your platoon was cut of and under enemy attack, and hearing a Dutch Air Mobile company was coming in as re-inforcements, or is your assesments of the Dutch Air Mobile brigade low (such as the fighting ability of the Ukrainian Air Mobile Brigade).

The problem with our military is that we have few NCO's/officers who have any combat experience. While in the British, American and French military, that number is much higher. And also during the training period of an Air Mobile Soldier, it's focussed solely on the physical condition of a soldier. While in the American Ranger School, not only are it's recruits tested on physical challenges, but also mental and tactical challenges (such as setting up ambushes, and organising raids in night time).

So am I right in my thinking, or not?
 

SLehman

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Domenique:

I have to keep this answer brief but during operation Medusa in Afghanistan, the Dutch were there with us. Medusa was the largest NATO war operation.

Don't sell your countrymen short. You need to be a great soldier to be an effective peace keeper.
 

CVW1968

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I served 5 years in the Dutch air mobile brigade, from '96 till 2001, after my time in the Legion (yes I know, I’m blue, not green, no, not deserted, did my time, even have that “thanks and goodbyeâ€￾ paper somewhere...).

Good team there (I was in 13 airmobile) but politics crashed or balls after Yugo (Srebrenica). Soldiers all the world are the same: run and wait, always out of money, hang over’s 5 mornings a week, ugly as hell. And believe me, a bullet doesn't make any difference, if you have a Red, Green or Blue beret on you ugly scull, and it doesn't give a shit what training you had before. Out is Out.

You just need some luck, and good mates. I had them both, in France and NL.

So Domenique, don’t get your opinions out of newspapers, get a life. Go to a recruiting office and, believe me, I don’t care where you join, Holland or France. Best case scenario, they'll keep you away from the keyboard and internet during 4 months, so we can continue here on the forum with more interesting discussions.

BR,
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SLehman

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CVW

Well put, thanks for both your service and contribution to this discussion.

Steve
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Don Pedro

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Back in 1993, with the FREBAT2, in Sarajevo, I did meet some Dutch. Never knew what outfit they were in. In 1995, with the Rapid Reaction Force, the Dutch Marines, especially their Heavy mortar platoon (120mm, same brand as ours) was very active.

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Don Pedro

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Mount Igman, indeed correct, with our 2 mortar Platoons (one under the U.N mandate) and the Dutch, we teamed up 18 tubes, add to that the Bonny lads from Colchester with their battery of 105mm light guns and last but not least, the French Artillery with the the 155mm, a few big bangs for the money.
 
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Martin Scott

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Remember the Dutch guys and girls in Cyprus when on a UN Tour, All good eggs the majority of them but the ladies on NISI BEACH they know how to party.:eek::eek:
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SLehman

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I recall during 93/94 around Maglai FRY (Former Republic of Yugoslavia) that a Dutch tank platoon came under fire around 'The Spotted Dog cafe' and they let loose with each and every main armament round from the Leopards. That's about 59 rounds for each tank within the platoon. This impromptu gun camp ensured that they didn't get engaged again. The Dutch had sent a clear message.
 

Don Pedro

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One shitty cold night on Igman, we got one incoming shell, I was trying to get some shuteye, heard the efer, only realised it was an incoming, when it landed. It landed (no casualties) between 1er Esc/1REC and the Bonny lads from Colchester with a big bang (I almost crapped myself) and in the next 5 minutes everyone was ready for action and action it went. I swear to God, those lads were Jocks, sobers, cussing and pissed off as us and that night, the Dutch, British and French, gave a 10 minute concert in C-Crash, 'swoosh zoooom kabang!' Party over, all back to wank off, peacefully. :)
 
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Domenique1990

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I served 5 years in the Dutch air mobile brigade, from '96 till 2001, after my time in the Legion (yes I know, I’m blue, not green, no, not deserted, did my time, even have that “thanks and goodbyeâ€￾ paper somewhere...).

Good team there (I was in 13 airmobile) but politics crashed or balls after Yugo (Srebrenica). Soldiers all the world are the same: run and wait, always out of money, hang over’s 5 mornings a week, ugly as hell. And believe me, a bullet doesn't make any difference, if you have a Red, Green or Blue beret on you ugly scull, and it doesn't give a shit what training you had before. Out is Out.

You just need some luck, and good mates. I had them both, in France and NL.

So Domenique, don’t get your opinions out of newspapers, get a life. Go to a recruiting office and, believe me, I don’t care where you join, Holland or France. Best case scenario, they'll keep you away from the keyboard and internet during 4 months, so we can continue here on the forum with more interesting discussions.

BR,
184757
681214178
But there is a difference in the foreign policies of the various countries. For example, if NATO decides to launch a ground offensive against ISIS, the Netherlands would not be a part of it. Why? Because wars are expensive, the Netherlands might lose expensive AH-64 attack helicopters, Cougar transport helicopters or F-16 fighter planes, and expending a lot of ammunition. As well as having to pay a bonus for serving overseas, and what if ISIS manages to wipe out an entire platoon of Dutch soldiers, any idea what kind of political consequences that would have? All those career politicians would see their positions in jeopardy, the Prime Minister and his cabinet would need to resign and government parties would lose their seats, so they would never risk it.

While the British and French government would be more willing to provide ground troops for such an expedition.

So that's one of the doubts that I am having. I have the opportunity to serve as an NCO but i don't see the point of serving if I will never be deployed for what I've been trained in. It's like going to university to study law, and then never working as a lawyer or judge, seems a bit pointless to waste all that time for nothing.

So tell me, what would serving as an NCO gain me? What makes serving worth it? In terms of training, experiences, pay, deployments and daily life in the brigade.

PS: Since you joined the "Luchtmobiele Brigade" AFTER your service in the Legion. Did your previous military experience benefit you during your time in the brigade? And I don't mean being in better physical shape, etc. but in terms of promotion. I assume they would value a veteran of the Legion, to serve in the Air Mobile Brigade. And if you compared your service in the Legion, and in the air mobile brigade, which would you define as better trained and disciplined, or was it more or less the same?
 

Don Pedro

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Domenique, you couldn't even serve as a latrin cleaner, time to get a grip of your scrotum, quit bitching and leave your left wings religious Pot-lical butt feckers, behind. When shite hit the fan, they will sell YOU, to save THEIR lives. You couldn't lead snails across the road, so don't go all NCO on us. Hate me, even the Girl Scouts would turn you down. :) Offside, in life, what is your main occupation, aka what do you do for a living? Turning pages, Scouting the Internet? Myself, Machinist, Welder and Metal Fabrication in civilian life, a short ride with the Legion and now living life. I bet you don't have the common sense to tell us.
 

SLehman

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Domenique:

A brave young president once said, “ask not what your country can do for you, ask what you can do for your country.â€￾

If you have to ask what is the point of serving your nation, don't bother as you have nothing to contribute.
 
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So young man, now you know. A succinct and cogent comment made by Steve. With which I concur.
 

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(...) So that's one of the doubts that I am having. I have the opportunity to serve as an NCO but i don't see the point of serving if I will never be deployed for what I've been trained in. It's like going to university to study law, and then never working as a lawyer or judge, seems a bit pointless to waste all that time for nothing.

So tell me, what would serving as an NCO gain me? What makes serving worth it? In terms of training, experiences, pay, deployments and daily life in the brigade. (...)
If you see no point in serving, military career is not your cup of tea. May I suggest some civilian, non-government agencies? Something politically active, ecology or human rights/liberties, equality of women in today's society? You would get to express your opinion on daily basis (unlike in the army), and even got paid for it. You could accuse people everyday that they are right wingers, one-minded fascists, foreign agents, etc. Basically what you're doing here... and you would get paid for it!
 
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Domenique1990

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Domenique:

A brave young president once said, “ask not what your country can do for you, ask what you can do for your country.â€￾

If you have to ask what is the point of serving your nation, don't bother as you have nothing to contribute.
Well, “serving my countryâ€￾ isn't the problem. It's the way the government deploys its troops, and the quality of the training that is the problem. Every soldier wants to be able to use their training on the battlefield, but unfortunately the politicians decide that, and not the soldiers. If it was up to the soldiers, they would be deployed against ISIS or Boko Haram right now, but unfortunately we have a rather pacifist and bureaucratic nation, that would never risk such an expedition.
 

SLehman

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Well, “serving my countryâ€￾ isn't the problem. It's the way the government deploys its troops, and the quality of the training that is the problem. Every soldier wants to be able to use their training on the battlefield, but unfortunately the politicians decide that, and not the soldiers. If it was up to the soldiers, they would be deployed against ISIS or Boko Haram right now, but unfortunately we have a rather pacifist and bureaucratic nation, that would never risk such an expedition.
As one of your great countrymen said “War is sweet to those who have not experienced it.â€￾ Desiderius Erasmus

If you yearn for war so much, why are you still sitting safely in the Netherlands complaining, when you could be fighting ISIS or Boko Haram right now, unless you're a pacifist or bureaucrat that would never risk such an expedition?

“Manliness consists not in bluff, bravado or loneliness. It consists in daring to do the right thing and facing consequences whether it is in matters social, political or other. It consists in deeds not words.â€￾ Mahatma Gandhi

Deeds not words.
 
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Domenique1990

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As one of your great countrymen said “War is sweet to those who have not experienced it.â€￾ Desiderius Erasmus

If you yearn for war so much, why are you still sitting safely in the Netherlands complaining, when you could be fighting ISIS or Boko Haram right now, unless you're a pacifist or bureaucrat that would never risk such an expedition?

“Manliness consists not in bluff, bravado or loneliness. It consists in daring to do the right thing and facing consequences whether it is in matters social, political or other. It consists in deeds not words.â€￾ Mahatma Gandhi

Deeds not words.
Yes, I have read that quote before. But what is the point of serving, if you never nor want to experience war? It's basically "work experience" for a professional soldier. Soldiering isn't meant as job security for the destitute, it's meant to protect and defend the nation, and it's interest abroad.

That's what i call being petty, but then again, it fit's your M.O. Since you are often very petty and making constant ad hominem attacks. There is a difference between an untrained militia fighter, and a billion dollar national military (incl various combat brigades, artillery, air support, medical staff and central command etc).
 

voltigeur

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Gee, it is turning into another koffee klatch.:mad:
 
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Martin Scott

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One shitty cold night on Igman, we got one incoming shell, i was trying to get some shuteye, heard the efer, only realised it was an incoming, when it landed. It landed ( No Causulties) between 1er Esc/1REC and the Bonny lads from Colchester with a big bang (i almost crapped myself) and next 5minutes everyone was ready for action and action it went, i swear to God, those lads were Jocks, sobers, cussing and pissed off as us and that night, the Dutch, British and French, gave a 10 minute concert in C-Crash, 'swoosh zoooom kabang!' Party over, all back to wank off, peacefully. :)
Message received by the enemy. Don't feck with us, you'll get hurt seriously. By the away that goes for us guys in MPLE as well.

Yes, I have read that quote before. But what is the point of serving, if you never nor want to experience war? It's basically "work experience" for a professional soldier. Soldiering isn't meant as job security for the destitute, it's meant to protect and defend the nation, and it's interest abroad.

That's what i call being petty, but then again, it fit's your M.O. Since you are often very petty and making constant ad hominem attacks. There is a difference between an untrained militia fighter, and a billion dollar national military (incl various combat brigades, artillery, air support, medical staff and central command etc).
You really haven't got a clue really, until you have stood a post, put your life in another man's hands and he in yours and picked up a rifle. Do us all a favour: go a long way away or do a stint in a veteran's hospital, then and only then tell us of your experience.

As one of your great countrymen said “War is sweet to those who have not experienced it.â€￾ Desiderius Erasmus

If you yearn for war so much, why are you still sitting safely in the Netherlands complaining, when you could be fighting ISIS or Boko Haram right now, unless you're a pacifist or bureaucrat that would never risk such an expedition?

“Manliness consists not in bluff, bravado or loneliness. It consists in daring to do the right thing and facing consequences whether it is in matters social, political or other. It consists in deeds not words.â€￾ Mahatma Gandhi

Deeds not words.
Steve and Don don't rise or feed this, it's what he gets off on. Think we should all retire to the Foyer for a few cold ones. Anciens and veterans only !!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

So young man, now you know. A succinct and cogent comment made by Steve. With which I concur.
Totally with you on this one as well Charles.
 

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