The grim "reality" of the French Foreign Legion.

dusaboss

Hyper Active Member
#41
I really don't hear many if any bad things about ffl from greens on this forum.

666 is right when his say that there is certain amount of denial going on here.
 
#42
Sometimes its the shit that bonds everybody together. Obviously it wont always be sunshine and roses but its the good moments that make it worth it. If the Legion was fun everybody would do it.
 

jonny

Actual or Former Legionnaire
Legionnaire
#44
Dusaboss,

I never saw anything like that happened during my five years in the Legion in the 1950s/60s, but on the other hand, it seems to me like Legion NCOs now want to try to live up to their imaginatory hard-ass Legion NCOs of Morocco, Algeria and Indochina. Perhaps movies or books-fed fantasies. Silly buggers!
 
#45
Snafu, " to grow roses you need rain and shit (manure) to enjoy them when they bloom during spring".

This is my own inspirational quote which I'm going to have Copy Righted. :cool:
When are you starting your t-shirt business? One can also use the good old phrase “the grass is greener on the other side, because there's more shite.”
 
#46
No you’re right Joseph the comment was not directed at yourself it was directed at the negative experience a member had!
To avoid any possible confusion, the initial, negative, post in this thread is not from a Cervens board member. It’s a quote from another board.

(...) it seems to me like Legion NCOs now want to try to live up to their imaginatory hard-ass Legion NCOs of Morocco, Algeria and Indochina. Perhaps movies or books-fed fantasies. Silly buggers!
Agree. This can happen. Even with young ‘gung-ho’ officers, like the 2e REP Lt who decided to punish one of the legionnaires in his platoon, who was complaining during a field exercise in Djibouti, by not accepting to let him drink water. This legionnaire had a reputation of being a ‘cry baby’ and the Lt didn’t take his complaints seriously. When he realised the legionnaire was in real trouble, it was too late and the guy eventually died.
The platoon leader had probably read too many “Marche ou crève” (March or die) type of books... He was sentenced by civilian justice and dismissed from the Army.
One could have a full thread of such incidents. Not common, but sometimes... shit happens. And in any armed force, not only the Legion.
 
#47
To avoid any possible confusion, the initial, negative, post in this thread is not from a Cervens board member. It’s a quote from another board.

Agree. This can happen. Even with young ‘gung-ho’ officers, like the 2e REP Lt who decided to punish one of the legionnaires in his platoon, who was complaining during a field exercise in Djibouti, by not accepting to let him drink water. This legionnaire had a reputation of being a ‘cry baby’ and the Lt didn’t take his complaints seriously. When he realised the legionnaire was in real trouble, it was too late and the guy eventually died.
The platoon leader had probably read too many “Marche ou crève” (March or die) type of books... He was sentenced by civilian justice and dismissed from the Army.
One could have a full thread of such incidents. Not common, but sometimes... shit happens. And in any armed force, not only the Legion.
I can speak to this from the Officer side of the house having been a 'young Lt' before.

Often the things that we want out of young officers (i.e. gung-ho, physically fit, youthful exuberance) can sometimes be detrimental to the troops under their command because they are naive and don't understand limitations or capabilities of their people.

This is why you need strong Senior NCOs to help guide young officers and also a strong company commander who can control and mentor them.

I've been an Infantry Officer for 14 years and there are things I did when I was younger that I look back upon as stupid. It's only through experience that Officers learn these lessons and it takes time because you are thrown in to command and have none.

I feel blessed everyday that I had a good a few good Senior NCOs that taught me the way to do things.
 
#48
canukroyal,

Never a truer word. I was fortunate to have served in the ranks prior to my commission. I freely admit that I was nursed as a YO by our inimitable SNCOs'. I always sought their advice and it was given in a kindly and sincere manner. After all they were incredibly experienced and they regarded me as their protégé since between us we did not want any cock ups. They were the salt of the earth and addressed me as 'Young Sir'. I knew I was accepted when they carried me back to my quarters after unit celebrations in their mess. Happy days indeed.
 

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