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Until you can join the forum - Questions !

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Joseph Cosgrove

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Hi V, I can only suggest that you contact the airport, even if you are not going by plane.
We've had one, who made it, a US citizen A_wnaderer.

I found this, I don't know if it will help dated from 13 august:
People seeking to enter France can take the test before traveling or at the border, except for those from Chile, Bosnia Herzegovina, Moldova, and Armenia, who must take the test before leaving the country.

https://www.aa.com.tr/en/europe/france-doubles-list-of-high-risk-covid-19-countries/1940632#

this is a little more up to date 01 October:
B. Algeria, Argentina, Armenia, Bolivia, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Brazil, Chile, Colombia, Costa Rica, Dominican Republic, Equatorial Guinea, India, Israel, Kirghizstan, Kosovo, Kuwait, Lebanon, Madagascar, Maldives, Mexico, Moldova, Montenegro, Oman, Palestinian Territories, Peru, Qatar, Serbia, South Africa or Turkey: you will have to either present a negative PCR test result, carried out less than 72 hours before departure, or submit to such a test at the airport upon arrival in France.

 

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If you have a flight from Montenegro to France...where is the ban on traveling?
So long as you are negative on Covid, you should be okay to go, imo
Wear your face mask at all times...even during the flight (it's the rule here in France)
 

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This from SC,

Firstly thank you for taking the time to post this.

1. I know the age limit is 39.5 but at do many people in their mid 30's get selected?

2. Does having served in the military & than as a PMC work in your favour or should you keep that to yourself in you interviews?

I’m 36(37 in February) served ten years in the British military and then moved into the PMC and maritime security industry which I worked until 2018. Since then I have drifted; lost touch with what friends and family I had and I am now to old to re enlist in the British military. I am fit and able bodied and would value your honest opinion on my chances of being considered.

Kind regards


No worries, mate,
As for your age, let's be honest it's going against you. However saying that there is an advantage if you can keep a low profile and get past the recruiters in Aubagne, the fact that you've got a few years experience in the army and PMC, will work in your favor.
The legion would be a pretty bad state if it was only young eastern blocks who are hoping for money and a passport, hence why the age limit is 39.5.
The only advice that I can give you is to go for it before it really is too late.
This from SC, I got it on Thursday, but forgot to check Loustic's mail yesterday 😲.

Good afternoon,

I was wondering if anyone has any further advice on selection preparation. My fitness is on track and so is my french but I would be grateful for a list of commands that are used and any marching songs that I could start to learn maybe.

I’m also interested in anything and or everything else that might be useful to know.

On a different note I had a conversation recently where I got some advice/information and was wondering if anyone could confirm it. I was advised to volunteer for something called Rapid for CPL’s at

Castel due to my age and previous military/PMC background and the request 2REI again I’d give the option. This is the first time I’d ever of “Rapid to CPL” so thought I would ask but if this is correct what leave of French (Spoken/reading/writing) would be required and what else?

Again I thank you in advance.
 

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Hi SC.

Sorry that I haven't gotten back to you before now. And also that no-one else has taken the tine to drop you a line.
I have actually done the the Rapid to CPL's course PPCME. I'll get back to you later on it.
 

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Ok, as promised, I'll try my best to answer your questions. First of all, I really wouldn't bother learning the drill orders. they will be drilled into you:whistle::LOL: . Even though I'm taking my time off from studying, I've still got it, Yeah ! :ROFLMAO:.
OK, everyone take it easy.
You can see the drill orders in any of the legion videos. They are quite easy compared to the Brit army. There are two things which have come to the foreground recently. One is learning the code d'honneur. This has been reported on by quite a few people. From what we've been told, you are given one evening or all night if that is what it takes, to learn it and then you are told to copy it out.

Article 1 Légionnaire, tu es un volontaire servant la France avec honneur et fidélité.

Article 2 Chaque légionnaire est ton frère d'arme, quelle que soit sa nationalité, sa race, sa religion. Tu lui manifestes toujours la solidarité étroite qui doit unir les membres d'une même famille.

Article 3 Respectueux des traditions, attaché à tes chefs, la discipline et la camaraderie sont ta force, le courage et la loyauté tes vertus.

Article 4 Fier de ton état de légionnaire, tu le montres dans ta tenue toujours élégante, ton comportement toujours digne mais modeste, ton casernement toujours net.

Article 5 Soldat d'élite, tu t'entraînes avec rigueur, tu entretiens ton arme comme ton bien le plus précieux, tu as le souci constant de ta forme physique.

Article 6 La mission est sacrée, tu l'exécutes jusqu'au bout et, s'il le faut, en opérations, au péril de ta vie.

Article 7 Au combat tu agis sans passion et sans haine, tu respectes les ennemis vaincus, tu n'abandonnes jamais ni tes morts, ni tes blessés, ni tes armes.

I believe that this is the latest one. It has been changed.
Perhaps you should try translating it, 1 so that you at least know what it's about and 2 to improve your French.
The other one is the tent exercise. Let me just see if I can't can't find the thread for it.
Found it, it's actually called the tent test,

tent ▶test.

Just in case you cannot click on there here is the URL in full https://cervens.net/forum/index.php?threads/tent-test.22607/

PPCME or préparation peloton certificat militaire elémentaire . I won't keep putting on the accents, just remember that they're there. The preparation side was, in my day, two months long in which to learn as much French, drill and getting fit before going on the peloton certificat militaire elémentaire, or in English your Cpl's course.
In my day you were given two weekends off per month while doing the course. We even went to a French army camp to stay while doing a civi parachute course, which is where I was found to be inapt para. It's a long story, but in the end I made it as can be testified over my right breast pocket.
I'm going to have to cut this short as I've made it a rule not to stay on the computer after 16:00.
Are two months concentrated learning French enough to be a corporal? In my opinion NO.
Once you have finished your two months prep, you then go straight onto your CME. I would just like to point out that you will be doing your course with those that have had at least 2 years in their regiment first and that you haven't left Top Gun :LOL:. I may be cutting it fine, but there's no stopping me once I start crackin' 'em.

I'll carry this on tomorrow. There is at least one other member on here who also did the PPCME, Jwaltos. He only drops in occasionally.
 

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So, I've done my sport and checked my emails and sent out a couple of CVs and added my two bahts worth to the forum. It's back to business.

Once you have finished your CME, you are then returned to your company where you have to do 2 full sections of basic training. I won't go into it in detail as I've got other things to do such as working on my channel;). What I will tell you is that doing basic training all over again, albeit as a Cpl can be a right pain in the ar$e.
Then you get to your regiment, on a personal note I mentioned that I was down as inapt TAP, or Para if you like, so I chose what I considered the next best thing, 3 REI.

Now before I go any further allow me to explain a couple of things here. 1) when you finish your two full sections you will be given your choice of regiment. 2) Back in my day you had four overseas postings of 2 years, 13 DBLE in Djibouti, DLEM in Mayotte, 5 RE in French Polynesia and 3 REI in French Guiana. 3) regardless of what the Night Jumper AKA Loustic (or his dad) wanted to make out, 3 REI is not a discipline posting.

OK, you've turned up at your regiment and tradition has it that you are caporal de jour or caporal de la semaine. both are for a week :ROFLMAO:. And once you have finished one you take over the next one. This is designed to let the section and the company know that you're the new deputy sheriff in town. I won't go into the details (again) but you have to be careful not to get walked over. Cpl de jour means that you are 'in charge' of the section's smooth running for a week. Cpl de la semaine means that you are in seconding the Sgt de la semaine in the running of the company for a week.

I would advise against becoming a fut fut for reasons that I've gone over in the past.

As for 2 REI, yes why not, they are always on the move and they are in a big town. However you will have time to decide which regiment you want to go to while you are in Castel. You may be asked what regiment you would like to go to during your interviews in Aubagne, but nobody really takes any notice. You will be explained the roles of the various regiments, there locations and some of their history while you're in Castel.

As for songs to learn, le Boudin. Even if it it's just learn it's history, such as why there are no sleeping rolls for the Belgians.
The Chant du "4"(RE), so that at least you know what you're singing about.

Alright, I believe that that is everything answered. I'm going to do a bit of work on 'Joe's Job Hunter's Channel' now.
 

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Received this yesterday, at 17:00, which is an hour after my 'cut off' time on the computer, as I hadn't checked the night jumper's :love: in-box during the day...

Hi Joseph

Have recently registered on cerevens.net A Scribbler and am waiting for approval and I understand there are some difficulties of a technical nature.

This is by way of an introduction I am a former serviceman British army from the seventies who approaching retirement is pursuing a new career at age 64 as an author my first effort was reasonably well received. “Eight days later”* on amazon.

I have been exploring ideas and have come up with a concept which I believe is unique in that there is very little modern fiction with a Legionnaire as the lead character . Voila

The idea I am working on is, for two brothers who want to join the Royal Marines. They are three years apart in age. The older joins the younger fails the medical due to an old knee injury.

So he Joins the foreign legion, serves ten years attaining the rank of sergeant chief in the 2nd Rep served with Groupement des Commandos Parachutistes (GCP) – Parachute Commando Group

Having been to Aubaine for his discharge he returns for one or two nights before flying out to Brazil to join his brother who is working as a bodyguard in San Paulo.

On his arrival he is informed that his brother has been murdered. And so the story begins

I believe that the Legion is unique due to the diverse cultural and ethnic mix from what I have heard that as a former legionnaire he would be able to avail himself of local resources from former members of the Legion. No other military offers that one unique facility or network.

Therefore I am looking to make sure that references to the legion are factually correct and aims achievable within the context of the writing, not wanting to discredit or offend serving or former Legionnaires.

So I am joining the forum to ask questions and establish credible content within my writing.
Hope you can assist with getting me on your forum

Regards
Steven


I checked out Steve's book on Amazon:

Check out▶ Steve's book
 

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I got this from Steve.

Hi Again Joseph

Thanks for adding me on to the forum I am looking forward to how the concept is received.

I have a number of questions more of a technical nature than anything else will let you know.

Thanks again

Steve


I did suggest to Steve that he got himself a handle. And I had warned him about how motivated the guys are on the forum at the moment.

Let me give him an example

Having been to Aubaine

Anyone who has been on the forum for more than a week might have pointed out that Aubagne was misspelled.

What I'd like to point out is the fact that his hero could not join the Marines because of an old knee injury.
I don't know what era the book is taking place in, but I would tell you that for many decades now the legion will not take the risk of taking anyone into its ranks with any kind of injury. More over knee injuries. And even less in the REP - I won't go into the GCP o_O which has one of, if not the, hardest entrance tests in the French army.

Why not just make the hero out to be a bananier? That will mean that he won't be able to get into the Marines and will be more than welcome into the ranks of la légion?

If he is going to Brazil, why not have him do a two year stint in the 3ème Reich or more formally known as 3 REI which is based in French Guiana (one of Loustic's old stampers:ROFLMAO:) which will make him jungle savvy.
Does anyone here recall the jock Mcfall(?) that's one of the problems with cutting down's someone's name to Mac.
He's in a video as an instructor in CEFE. He was a Caporal chef in the CRAP (forerunner to GCP).

If anyone else would like to add something, they are more than welcome.
 

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I got this from Steve, who is going under the name of A Scribbler.

Knee injury ok WTF is a bananier Google translates as a banana tree does this have some kind of symbolic meaning within the legion.

That aside Criminal convictions such as a bit of car thieving while pissed or something like that would preclude entry into the Marines. Presumably if declared to the Gestapo on enlistment it would not impede joining.

I have heard of a legionnaire with a detached retina Alex Rowe awarded Légion d'honneur who has just completed 20 years so maybe color blindness or perforated ear drum which would be a bar for the British army. Leaning towards a criminal thing at the moment.

As you have already worked out their will be a Guyanese connection.

I need to confirm that a legionnaire must go back to Aubagne for his discharge as he will receive documents and rectification if enlisted under an alias.

Re a handle I registered under “A Scribbler” but encountered the password problem am going to try something else that may work if it does I will say hello from inside the wire
Regards Steve

Off to do my Fifty


Hi A Scribbler. I can only wish you luck on being able to post. I'm told that it says that the person's post is awaiting Mod's approval, which is completely false. There are three Mods on the forum and none of us are keeping people from posting.

Alex Rowe's detached retina, may have happened after he joined.
Yes you do have to go back to Aubagne, regardless of your regiment in order to get your paperwork done. It is for a week. It's in a company called the CAPLE. You can check it out by using the search function:
The▶ CAPLE !!! :eek:

color blind▶ in the legion

info about▶ the GCP The guy who holds the 30Km TAP is a Zimbabwean

As for perforated eardrum, he wouldn't get past the first medical test.

Bananier (where is the night jumper when you need him). I'm off to do my sport, but don't forget that you you have the search function.

1604967929052.png
 
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Joseph Cosgrove

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Got this today from AS

Hey Joseph,

I’d hate to talk about sending a letter to the general because I don’t want to get a bunch of back lash. I went to aubagne in October 2019 in high hopes of joining the legion. MINUTES after I arrived, I received a text from back home (
I left this bit out) that my grandfather had passed away. We were really close so i felt i had to be there to pay my upmost respects. I didn’t receive any paper stating I was inapte indefinitif or anything. A few months passed and I came back to aubagne in March 2020. I am a EU citizen as well (I left this bit out). So i had no issues returning back to Europe during the start of covid. Anyways, I came back to aubagne and I took my pre-psychometric test and was all set. Until I was pulled aside and was told that since I left, i had to write a letter to the General. I have sent a couple letters but I don’t know if they were sent to the correct address. I understand the General doesn’t read them directly, but do you know the correct address to send them? I’m sick of being in the (I left this bit out). Too many Nancy’s. I always look forward to reading the forum! Gets me hyped up!

Thank you for your time!
 

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Monsieur le général commandant la Légion étrangère
COMMANDEMENT DE LA LEGION ETRANGERE
Quartier Viénot - B.P. 21 355
13 784 AUBAGNE CEDEX

No need to write the letter in French.

You should send the letter as a registered letter with acknowledgment of receipt. In the letter you should state how many times you have already tried to get an answer from them. Once you have received the acknowledgment of receipt, you should wait a period of time (3 weeks?) and then resend the same letter again stating that you have sent the letter twice now without any reply.

Give it another period of time say 1 month and go with copies of the two letters and receipts.

Make sure that you have dated the letters.

I would advise anyone corresponding with the legion to send any mail registered with acknowledgment of receipt. The mail clerk may be an Aubagne bureau boy, but will do his job in receptioning any and all letters addressed to the legion. He will then pass it on to some other bureau boy who it isn't guaranteed will do his job. I mean if the guy was worth his salt, do you think he would be working in an office in Aubagne :confused::cry::sleep:?
 

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The follow up to AS's request for the Gen's postal address:

Thank you for the quick reply! I really appreciate the info. I hope all is well and hope to hear something soon. You will be the first to get the update!

Thank you!

AS
 

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This from A Scribbler:

Hi Joseph

Thanks for the previous response I value your time and indeed effort in making the forum it is. Please believe me when I say it is a mother load of characters for any novelist established or aspirational such as myself. I continue to bash my keyboard did my fifty and corrected my spelling, Microsoft and predictive spelling has a lot to answer for.

Appreciate the bananier comment, yes I was being F***ing lazy. The google search however gives conflicting answers so I might come back on that one for context.

Having taken your comments on board This is a serious question The protagonist is a Sergent chief if we assume he enlisted in about 2005 given the insular nature of the legion and permissions required. Would he have been able to own such things as a laptop or smart phone as a single man living in accommodation. I am aware the rules changed regarding the traditional cash payments to bank accounts but permissions were required to buy things like a motor car or motor cycle because of the financial agreement and commitments, would the same apply to laptops and smart phones. The alternative being internet cafes which would have been readily available.

Value your opinion and the comments


Regards
Steven

I'd appreciate it if someone could give me a hand. If not Steve, I'll answer your questions when I get back from sport. Although my priority this morning is recording my latest video. Watch and shoot, watch and shoot, lads, this is the one !
 

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Hi Steve,

As a Sargent Chef, abbreviation Sch, who would be addressed as "Chef", living in camp, he would be perfectly within his right to own a Cell phone and a laptop. He would have his own room.
Most of the 'constraints' are limited to corporals and below. The fact that all Non-officers have to go in front of the company captain to buy a house or even a car is to make sure that the person is not buying beyond his means. For Sgts and over, it is merely a formality.
I'm told that nowadays even corporals with over 5 years of service who have their original name back can buy a car.

A bananier (noun) is a f*ck up (noun). ( Not a good reputation to have in la légion) To do a banane (verb) is to mess up.
As an old friend of mine Alex Garrett R.I.P. once said "a banane is never planned", and he should know;)
 

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Got this from Steve:
Hi Joseph

Grateful thanks for your last update it pretty much ties in with what I assumed but it is nice to have it validated

Have also started reading the book by Joel Adam Struthers “Appel” it gives a lot of good insight to the “Groupement des Commandos Parachutistes (GCP) and the lead character I am creating.
Really appreciate your time
Thanks
Steve
 

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This from A Scribbler:

Hi, Joseph Hope you are well and once again thanks for your input.

Just finished reading “Appel” by Joel Struthers, question aside this was a fantastic and insightful read and generated more questions than it answers, always the hallmark of a good book.

My question is this:

In the British army, let me take a moment to blow the dust off my boots. We had corps, the cooks
(I believe Steve means the CHEFS), engineers, drivers, medics, tanks all belonging to their home corps ACC REME RTC RE RCT etc. Then infantry,

normally county regiments as part of a division The Gloucester regt Devon and Dorset etc, as the Prince of wales division. The hairy legs north of the wall, The Highland Division. Then the Household Division,

and so it goes on, you will then stay with your joining regt or corps for the duration of your service, unless, special circumstances apply, inter regimental corps transfers are very rare.

If we take the Legion as a whole that is to say all the men and officers, it would appear that every man who passes through to legionnaire is “A Legionnaire” who can be moved around according to skill sets aptitude ability etc. So. “A Legionnaire“ after basic training could be shipped off to do a medics course and then be bounced around for a few years between regiments. He then volunteers to do a sniper, diver, demolition, driving course and will be moved to where he is needed on completion. this is similar to the American model where they move the man and not the men from location to location until deployment into active service.

Would this be a fair observation?
Regards Steve
 

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Hi A Scribbler, I'm going to get myself ready for my morning's sport and will tell you what you need to know when I get back.
 
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